Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th May 2009 12:28 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems As you'll hear in the latest OSNews podcast (recorded yesterday, published later today), we had a discussion about Sony and some of its failed attempts at capturing mind share with proprietary technologies, among which the excellent but mismanaged MiniDisc technology. Imagine my surprise when I was browsing the web this morning, looking for news, and stumbled upon a supposedly new model of the Aspire One - with a Vmedia drive. A what?
Thread beginning with comment 364482
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: I second
by coreyography on Wed 20th May 2009 02:43 UTC in reply to "RE: I second"
coreyography
Member since:
2009-03-06

Well, I guess thanks for the updates. I have not been "sleeping"; it is probably more likely that between the lack of good movies, and the "convenience" of going and getting a DVD from Red Box or Wal-Mart, I have little interest in transcoding or downloading my own (even at ~700MB).

I think the comments about the media companies are spot-on, but even in absence of that I still would not be jumping all over this new format; it is still in my mind inferior to flash memory devices.

I am also not so sure that bandwidth will continue to increase, at least not until there is more financial incentive for providers to increase it. Everywhere I look I see bandwidth providers trying to either cap it or charge more for it above a certain rate.

Edited 2009-05-20 02:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: I second
by bornagainenguin on Wed 20th May 2009 03:37 in reply to "RE[2]: I second"
bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

coreyography posted...

I am also not so sure that bandwidth will continue to increase, at least not until there is more financial incentive for providers to increase it. Everywhere I look I see bandwidth providers trying to either cap it or charge more for it above a certain rate.


This is why the improvements in codec capabilities is so important! It isn't going to be a 700MB file for much longer, instead it is going to become a 300-400MB file for a movie and somewhere between 50MBs to 100MBs for the average TV show. And the quality will be just as good as DVD is now or better.

So even if bandwidth becomes limited, the situation will be routed around by software improvements in video encoding!

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Parent Score: 2