Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th May 2009 14:23 UTC, submitted by hotice
KDE While most people focus on Microsoft Office and OpenOffice.org as being each other's competitors, there's a third player in this market: KOffice. While KOffice is obviously geared towards use on KDE, it's available for Windows, Mac OS X, and GNOME-based distributions as well, making it much more platform-independent than Microsoft's Office suite. Version 2.0.0 was released today, and comes with a whole boatload of improvements.
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RE[3]: good news
by boudewijn on Thu 28th May 2009 20:59 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: good news"
boudewijn
Member since:
2006-03-05

"it's bad enough for a new user that some of the apps have overly vague names. kexi? krita? karbon?"

Well, you know, all the good names are already taken. MyPaint, YouPaint, TheyPaint, ItPaint, WePaint...

Krita used to be called KImageShop -- guess what? We were sued. Not too surprising really. KImageShop was renamed to Krayon. You know what? We were sued. By Freiherr-let's-pose-as-a-poor-teenage-girl-to-catch-c64-tape-pirates- von Gravenreuth on behalf of a website that peddled e-cards and was called Crayon. Kandinsky was mooted for a new name. There's already an Atari ST graphics application of that name. Krita means "to draw" or "chalk" in Swedish, so it's at least somewhat on topic. And we're getting quite a good name recognition, plus, google alerts on "krita" generally are about krita. When they are not about an American nurse for the elderly of Indonesian extraction, that is.

And, frankly, the name PhotoShop doesn't really convey much to me about what the application does, nor does a name like Excel or Oracle help a lot.

I think you attach too much value to the descriptiveness of application names. Uniqueness is much more important, as is pronunciability or memorability. Krita, Kexi and Karbon do pretty good in those respects.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[4]: good news
by niemau on Thu 28th May 2009 21:21 in reply to "RE[3]: good news"
niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

don't take it personally. i wasn't trying to belittle those names by any means. it's more of a 'seeing the bigger picture' sort of thing. i just meant, since the names aren't particularly descriptive, it *could* help if the associated logos and/or icons would convey a little more info.

And, frankly, the name PhotoShop doesn't really convey much to me about what the application does, nor does a name like Excel or Oracle help a lot. I think you attach too much value to the descriptiveness of application names.


well, i've gotta disagree and say, 'PhotoShop' is pretty descriptive. but, i do agree with 'Excel'. luckily for MS, that particular app has a reputation that precedes it. and, to reiterate, it's not the descriptiveness of the name that is my main concern. (and concern is sort of a strong word... more of an observation.) basically, you can have a descriptive name or a descriptive logo/icon. without prior knowledge of an application, a new user probably won't bother.

but for what it's worth, i just found these:

http://pinheiro-kde.blogspot.com/2009/03/koffice-icons-2-highdef-on...

and they're pretty fantastic. the blog post says that these are 'application icons' but i am assuming they are actually mimetype icons maybe?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: good news
by kaiwai on Fri 29th May 2009 06:09 in reply to "RE[3]: good news"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

"it's bad enough for a new user that some of the apps have overly vague names. kexi? krita? karbon?"

Well, you know, all the good names are already taken. MyPaint, YouPaint, TheyPaint, ItPaint, WePaint...


How about this; "KDE Office Spreadsheet", "KDE Office Wordprocessor", "KDE Office Collaboration Suite". Sure, it isn't sexy but at least the end user would have the vaguest clue as to the purpose of the application.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: good news
by strcpy on Fri 29th May 2009 06:13 in reply to "RE[4]: good news"
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20

What? Ridiculous?

iPhone, iTunes, iMac.... ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: good news
by boudewijn on Fri 29th May 2009 07:39 in reply to "RE[4]: good news"
boudewijn Member since:
2006-03-05

Those aren't names, those are descriptions mixed with vendor information. The descriptions are already shown in the startup menu of KDE, more prominently actually than the application name so you _already_ get those.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: good news
by lemur2 on Fri 29th May 2009 09:17 in reply to "RE[4]: good news"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

How about this; "KDE Office Spreadsheet", "KDE Office Wordprocessor", "KDE Office Collaboration Suite". Sure, it isn't sexy but at least the end user would have the vaguest clue as to the purpose of the application.


The purpose of each application forms the text of the menu entry via which you start the application.

e.g

Applications Menu --> Office ---> Kword Word Processor

I have Lancelot menu settings set to "Show categories inside the applet", so that the Applications menu button is left-most in the panel, in the position where on Windows you would find the Start button. So it is literally just three clicks to start up.

The application name (in this case Kword) and its purpose (in this case, Word Processor) are on separate lines of the menu, next to the menu icon. The menu icon is a pencil, writing out the capital letter "W".

http://ourlan.homelinux.net/qdig/?Qwd=./KDE4%20desktop&Qiv=name...

It couldn't be simpler. Even you should have got "the vaguest clue" about what the application is, and what it does, from all that.

Edited 2009-05-29 09:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2