Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th May 2009 19:17 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Ask OSNews is apparently quite popular among you guys; the questions just keep on coming in. Since David took on the first two, we decided to let me handle this one - it's an area I've personally covered before on OSNews: file system layouts. One of our readers, a Linux veteran, studied the GoboLinux effort to introduce a new filesystem layout, and wondered: "Why not adopt the more sensible file system from GoboLinux as the new LSB standard?"
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RE[2]: Down with the FHS
by cb_osn on Fri 29th May 2009 05:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Down with the FHS"
cb_osn
Member since:
2006-02-26

There are 30 years of accumulated wisdom in the current layout.

The problem is that it's not really 30 years of accumulated wisdom. It's simply wisdom from 30 years ago. And it provides solutions to problems that aren't applicable to a modern desktop.

This type of thinking is endemic to Linux development. That's why every Linux desktop still runs a graphics stack that favors network transparency over hardware acceleration.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Down with the FHS
by strcpy on Fri 29th May 2009 06:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Down with the FHS"
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20

But if something has existed in computing for thirty years, it certainly is an asset, not an obstacle.

And Linux is derived from UNIX, the ideal type of a system that has proven itself for decades. Nothing else in the realm of operating systems has had such a profound effect on design and implementation of operating systems.

And here are people like you demanding to destroy tradition in the name of perceived progress, always bringing the mythical Desktop and usability to the table.

Changing a file system hierarchy is not an innovation, and a file system hierarchy should have absolutely nothing to do with a so-called Desktop.

Edited 2009-05-29 06:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Down with the FHS
by cb_osn on Fri 29th May 2009 09:37 in reply to "RE[3]: Down with the FHS"
cb_osn Member since:
2006-02-26

If you are willing to disregard the significance of the "mythical desktop" and the trouble that UNIX has experienced gaining traction in that space, then there really isn't much to discuss.

Ironically, the underlying message in my post was that UNIX reactionaries such as yourself are inadvertently sabotaging the chances of Linux on the desktop by resisting any change that may "destroy tradition."

Though responses like yours give me the feeling that, for some at least, it may not be inadvertent at all.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Down with the FHS
by asmoore82 on Sat 30th May 2009 03:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Down with the FHS"
asmoore82 Member since:
2009-03-11

The problem is that it's not really 30 years of accumulated wisdom. It's simply wisdom from 30 years ago. And it provides solutions to problems that aren't applicable to a modern desktop.

It's actually 40 YEARS OF ACCUMULATED WISDOM.
I can purge my system of locally compiled software by
simply deleting /usr/local whilst simultaneously causing
no damage whatsoever to the packaged software.

Your statement is pure, concentrated ignorance.

On Windows, if you think for one second that you can rid
yourself of all traces of software by using "Add/Remove"
AND/OR deleting its folder in "Program Files,"
that is just more fantastic ignorance.


This type of thinking is endemic to Linux development.

You may be right - it's those darn developers -
they should immediately start thinking like
lawyers, prostitutes and/or carpenters!
On second thought, wouldn't computing be better off if
we just eliminated those pesky developers altogether?


That's why every Linux desktop still runs a graphics stack that favors network transparency over hardware acceleration.

All of my Linux systems have both.
And I actually use both on a daily basis.
I have and enjoy the best of both worlds, so what's the big problem?

Please, what is so broken that needs fixing?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Down with the FHS
by cb_osn on Sat 30th May 2009 04:52 in reply to "RE[3]: Down with the FHS"
cb_osn Member since:
2006-02-26

It's actually 40 YEARS OF ACCUMULATED WISDOM.

I'm going to go ahead and assume that ACCUMULATED WISDOM is not the same thing as accumulated wisdom, since you put in the effort to mash the shift key long enough to differentiate them.

I can purge my system of locally compiled software by
simply deleting /usr/local whilst simultaneously causing
no damage whatsoever to the packaged software.

Yes! Everyone I know has just been dying to locally compile a huge collection of software and then purge it all in one fell swoop. Thanks.

Your statement is pure, concentrated ignorance.

I heard that the expulsion of "pure, concentrated ignorance" is a symptom of swine flu.


On Windows, if you think for one second that you can rid
yourself of all traces of software by using "Add/Remove"
AND/OR deleting its folder in "Program Files,"
that is just more fantastic ignorance.

I searched and searched, but for the life of me, I cannot figure out what you are referring to in my post. I'm fairly certain I didn't mention Windows at all. Perhaps, through the miracle of the internet, you have contracted my swine flu and are expelling some pure, concentrated stuff of your own.


You may be right - it's those darn developers -
they should immediately start thinking like
lawyers, prostitutes and/or carpenters!
On second thought, wouldn't computing be better off if
we just eliminated those pesky developers altogether?

Prostitutes? What?

All of my Linux systems have both.
And I actually use both on a daily basis.
I have and enjoy the best of both worlds, so what's the big problem?

This is an example of the problem: http://keithp.com/blogs/Sharpening_the_Intel_Driver_Focus/
It is absolute madness and is the direct result of trying to shoehorn a modern graphics system into an architecture that was in no way designed to support it.


Please, what is so broken that needs fixing?

According to some fraction of the 1% of desktop Linux users, everything is hunky dory. With numbers like that, it must be perfect.

Reply Parent Score: 2