Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th May 2009 14:23 UTC, submitted by hotice
KDE While most people focus on Microsoft Office and OpenOffice.org as being each other's competitors, there's a third player in this market: KOffice. While KOffice is obviously geared towards use on KDE, it's available for Windows, Mac OS X, and GNOME-based distributions as well, making it much more platform-independent than Microsoft's Office suite. Version 2.0.0 was released today, and comes with a whole boatload of improvements.
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smitty
Member since:
2005-10-13

The idea behind the package manager is that no one wants to download all of Qt and kdelibs 50 times to install 50 apps, or to make a simple IM installer be 100MB+ to include all the dependencies.

However, it is annoying if you're just trying to grab a single app. I think eventually certain apps like KOffice and Amarok will provide stand alone installers, but I don't know when that will happen. I don't think Windows development is a priority, really, they're trying to attract more developers who can make it integrate better while the existing ones are mostly focusing on Linux still.

Reply Parent Score: 3

boudewijn Member since:
2006-03-05

I know that both the kde-windows as well as the kde-mac people are investigating things like CPack to make standalone installers for those platforms of KDE software. But it is a hard problem that isn't solved yet. In fact, I don't think KOffice 2.0 has been packaged for Windows at all, although I have seen Patrick Spendrin make commits towards that goal.

But the kind of conceited hyperbole bornagainpenguin spews does a great injustice to the really great and hard work the kde-windows people have done. There are very few of them and they are doing great and pioneering work. Is the result perfect already? No. Can bornagainpenguin do any better? Unless he proves it, I'll assume he is incapable of doing that. Just as he is incapable of reading the KOffice 2.0 release announcement and understanding the target audience of this platform release.

And anyone who has ever had to package Windows software using an installer, whether bitrock, nsis or msi, knows that that is not an easy thing. Completely apart from the crt-problem, there are so many vagaries associated with making an installer that for larger software projects it's a full-time effort in itself.

Reply Parent Score: 4

bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

boudewijn sneered...

[T]he kind of conceited hyperbole bornagainpenguin spews does a great injustice to the really great and hard work the kde-windows people have done. There are very few of them and they are doing great and pioneering work.


And mostly what they have are toys. I remember the hype around cygwin, and how it went exactly nowhere over the years despite the excitement generated. I personally have always thought it was at least in part due to the complicated installation procedure people lost interest. Now when I see these same types of errors repeating with another interesting project...what should I do? Bury my head in the sand and pretend everything is great?

boudewijn sneered...
Is the result perfect already? No. Can bornagainpenguin do any better? Unless he proves it, I'll assume he is incapable of doing that. Just as he is incapable of reading the KOffice 2.0 release announcement and understanding the target audience of this platform release.


ad hominem much?

boudewijn sneered...
And anyone who has ever had to package Windows software using an installer, whether bitrock, nsis or msi, knows that that is not an easy thing. Completely apart from the crt-problem, there are so many vagaries associated with making an installer that for larger software projects it's a full-time effort in itself.


I'm not saying it would be easy, I'm just saying it is worthwhile. Certainly better than implementing yet another package-manager for Windows that will simply get re-invented the next time someone else comes up with the bright idea to shoe-horn Unix methods into a Windows system. Unless we were talking about something used all throughout the system it is useless to create yet another package-manager that the average Windows user won't use any way.

The application works, is supposedly available for the platform, so why not just get it on that platform with as few hoops as possible?

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Parent Score: 2

bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

smitty posted...

The idea behind the package manager is that no one wants to download all of Qt and kdelibs 50 times to install 50 apps, or to make a simple IM installer be 100MB+ to include all the dependencies.


I have less issues with the requirement for libraries and more of one with the bolting on of a package-manager on a system that doesn't use it. I understand the applications will have library requirements, but since this is KOffice we're talking about here, shouldn't it be much easier to just install the suite of applications KOffice comes with and all dependencies from a single installer? One that I can download all at once in a zip file?

smitty posted...
I don't think Windows development is a priority, really, they're trying to attract more developers who can make it integrate better while the existing ones are mostly focusing on Linux still.


It never seems to be, does it? Yet I first used Firefox, OpenOffice.org, Frozen Bubbles, ZSNES, VLC, etc etc on Windows, not Linux. Then when I did move to Linux for most of my daily stuff I was pleased to have those applications there for me, that I'd already become accustomed to using on Windows.

--bornagainpenguin

PS: Sorry for the time between posts--I was scheduled to go see Star Trek again and I wasn't about to miss it for anything.

Reply Parent Score: 2