Linked by snydeq on Mon 1st Jun 2009 16:27 UTC
Google Qualcomm showed off a previously unannounced Eee PC running Android at Computex in Taipei. The machine has a 10-inch screen, built-in webcam, and a universal 3G radio that supports all UMTS and CDMA networks on all frequencies used around the world. The 'smartbook' runs on Qualcomm's Snapdragon, a 1GHz ARM processor core that marks a shift away from Intel Atom x86-based netbooks. A second Android-based netbook -- a prototype by contract hardware maker Compal Electronics -- was also demoed at the show. Google, meanwhile, declined to discuss what steps it is taking to adapt the smartphone OS for laptops.
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RE[2]: Left hand meet right hand
by WereCatf on Mon 1st Jun 2009 20:50 UTC in reply to "RE: Left hand meet right hand"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

As for ARM processors; they need to get Flash working, without flash and some decent CODEC support for music and video, its going to be 'epic fail'. The problem that I see is that if ASUS does ship this, they'll try to do it on the cheap and thus have missing key components to make the internet experience alot more pleasant.

Adobe Flash does exist for ARM processors already AFAIK, and they could always use Gnash as a backup. And FFMPEG supports almost every codec out there and what it doesn't support can be found in other packages. I don't have that Win32codecs package installed on my Linux at all yet everything I've thrown at my Linux has worked just peachy.

But yeah, given ASUS's bad track record at actually doing any decent job at anything their product will most likely not be anything spectacular.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Adobe Flash does exist for ARM processors already AFAIK, and they could always use Gnash as a backup. And FFMPEG supports almost every codec out there and what it doesn't support can be found in other packages. I don't have that Win32codecs package installed on my Linux at all yet everything I've thrown at my Linux has worked just peachy.

But yeah, given ASUS's bad track record at actually doing any decent job at anything their product will most likely not be anything spectacular.


Even if they shipped FFMPEG, they would still have to pay royalties for using patented CODECS, and the win32codecs package is of questionable legality; so I don't see either solution being used let alone Asus trying to get Gnash working considering that Gnash is still far from being in a stable and useful state (non-feature complete).

As for the ARM version, they Arm version is a cut down version of Flash so it isn't equal to the full desktop version of it. What Arm needs is the fully fledged Flash that is available on the desktop and not some cut down mobile phone version which is missing key features which some developers are sure to use.

Asus when it comes to making hardware is ok - I have a Eee PC and as happy as larry, and when it comes to installing turn key solutions that require them to make no effort in terms of customisation they seem to do an ok job at it; btw, I am doing a report on the Eeepc which I bought, lots of praise for it btw when it comes to using it as a netbook. I just hope that maybe in a couple of years some of the rough edges of Linux will be smoothed - but lets be honest though, the focus on the desktop by a single vendor with some dollars.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Even if they shipped FFMPEG, they would still have to pay royalties for using patented CODECS, and the win32codecs package is of questionable legality; so I don't see either solution being used let alone Asus trying to get Gnash working considering that Gnash is still far from being in a stable and useful state (non-feature complete).


ffmpeg is free software (and freedom software). It is more capable than w32codecs, and it is not just a bunch of x86 binary-only codecs designed for Windows. Unlike w32codecs, ffmpeg is not a copy of anyone else's code. ffmpeg violates no copyrights.

As for patents ... extremely dubious. There is no "physical machine" involved in the function of a codec, it is pure mathematics. As such, in almost every country on the planet, a codec is not patentable. Even in the US, in view of the in re Bilski decision, a codec is probably not patentable.

So in using w32codecs you could fall foul of copyright law, if it can be shown that you are distributiong a copy of someone else's code. they are x86 only anyway, so of no use to ARM.

ffmpeg/libavcodec OTOH is not a copy of proprietary code. There should be no problem distributing it.

Adobe and open source:

http://opensource.adobe.com/wiki/display/site/Home
http://opensource.adobe.com/wiki/display/site/Projects
http://stlab.adobe.com/

Edited 2009-06-02 00:11 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

memson Member since:
2006-01-01

Flash 9 runs on the N800 - ARM LINUX based.

Reply Parent Score: 2