Linked by snydeq on Mon 1st Jun 2009 16:27 UTC
Google Qualcomm showed off a previously unannounced Eee PC running Android at Computex in Taipei. The machine has a 10-inch screen, built-in webcam, and a universal 3G radio that supports all UMTS and CDMA networks on all frequencies used around the world. The 'smartbook' runs on Qualcomm's Snapdragon, a 1GHz ARM processor core that marks a shift away from Intel Atom x86-based netbooks. A second Android-based netbook -- a prototype by contract hardware maker Compal Electronics -- was also demoed at the show. Google, meanwhile, declined to discuss what steps it is taking to adapt the smartphone OS for laptops.
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RE[2]: Left hand meet right hand
by WereCatf on Mon 1st Jun 2009 21:14 UTC in reply to "RE: Left hand meet right hand"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

An arm port of Windows wont be of much use without apps to run on it.

Well, Microsoft could always integrate x86 emulation into Windows so that you could run x86 applications on ARM Windows.. You'd sacrifice helluva lot of performance then though, so it wouldn't work for any intensive applications. It would probably work for any simpler apps like f.ex. office work.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

An arm port of Windows wont be of much use without apps to run on it. Well, Microsoft could always integrate x86 emulation into Windows so that you could run x86 applications on ARM Windows.. You'd sacrifice helluva lot of performance then though, so it wouldn't work for any intensive applications. It would probably work for any simpler apps like f.ex. office work.


ARM processors running at 1GHz in battery-powered mobile devices just don't have enough processing grunt to make such a thing practical.

Is it possible? Yes. Is it useable at al? No. Sorry.

If you want an application to work on an ARM device of this capability ... take the original source code and re-compile it for ARM. That is the ONLY practical way to run things on on an ARM device.

If you have an x86 binary-only copy of an application, you can forget about trying to run it satisfactorily on an ARM netbook.

Reply Parent Score: 2