Linked by Kroc Camen on Wed 3rd Jun 2009 21:07 UTC, submitted by Liquidator
Opera Software Opera have announced the general availability of Opera 10 beta. Opera 10 includes an improved rendering engine Presto v2.2. The beta adds a new default skin and a couple of new features, notably "Turbo", a proxy compressor for dial-up users, and tab previews. The result? Complete fail. Read More for why and a quick screenshot tour. addendum: As an apology to the community for the reckless and inadequate review I will be doing it again, properly, taking into consideration your fine comments.
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RE[2]: The opera logo
by Ruahine on Thu 4th Jun 2009 07:29 UTC in reply to "RE: The opera logo"
Ruahine
Member since:
2005-07-07

The problem is that you can't separate functionality from looks. A program that looks awful will affect its usability and hence its functionality. A program's appearance has an influence on whether the user thinks it feels natural.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: The opera logo
by Glynser on Thu 4th Jun 2009 07:39 in reply to "RE[2]: The opera logo"
Glynser Member since:
2007-11-29

I never used the Opera default skin, I always switch to "Windows Native" and guess what, suddenly it looked like an ordinary application.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: The opera logo
by flynn on Thu 4th Jun 2009 11:02 in reply to "RE[3]: The opera logo"
flynn Member since:
2009-03-19

I never used the Opera default skin, I always switch to "Windows Native" and guess what, suddenly it looked like an ordinary application.

I haven't used the previous versions, but the Windows Native theme on Opera 10 beta looks positively horrid. The default theme is several order of magnitudes better.

I have actually been quite impressed by the Beta and will continue to use it, as my main browser, at least for now.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: The opera logo
by No it isnt on Thu 4th Jun 2009 09:30 in reply to "RE[2]: The opera logo"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

The problem is that you can't separate functionality from looks. A program that looks awful will affect its usability and hence its functionality. A program's appearance has an influence on whether the user thinks it feels natural.



That's a claim that may or may not be true, and neither you nor the reviewer back it up in any way. Sorry, I won't take the claim as truth based only on the authority of a random douchebag on the internet.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: The opera logo
by Laurence on Thu 4th Jun 2009 14:01 in reply to "RE[2]: The opera logo"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

The problem is that you can't separate functionality from looks. A program that looks awful will affect its usability and hence its functionality. A program's appearance has an influence on whether the user thinks it feels natural.


You're confusing terms there.

Looks have little to no impact on functionality. Particularly when the looks in question is just a skin that's easily (like 3 button clicks in Opera's case) to change.

Looks DO have an impact on emotion and this can have an impact on whether a user finds the application natural. But this is an emotional response rather than a rational based on how well the application performs / how functional it is.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: The opera logo
by StephenBeDoper on Thu 4th Jun 2009 20:31 in reply to "RE[2]: The opera logo"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

The problem is that you can't separate functionality from looks. A program that looks awful will affect its usability and hence its functionality.


I call BS - usability and aesthetics are related, but not interdependent. Usability does not depend on aesthetics.

Take Forte Agent, for example - despite having one of the ugliest GUIs in existence (with earlier versions, at least), it's also widely considered to be one of the most usable and robust NNTP clients around.

Reply Parent Score: 2