Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 5th Jun 2009 14:05 UTC
Google We barely ended the discussion on Chrome's sandboxing feature and how hard or easy it is to implement such functionality on Mac OS X and Linux, and we have the Chromium project releasing the first builds of Google Chrome for Linux and Mac OS X "officially". Nightly builds for these platforms have been available since earlier this year, but this is the first time the project puts out actual releases for Mac and Linux.
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RE: Comment by maaxx
by adiwibowo on Sat 6th Jun 2009 02:29 UTC in reply to "Comment by maaxx"
adiwibowo
Member since:
2005-07-15

"Requires Intel Pentium 4 / Athlon 64 or later CPU, and 32 or 64 bit Ubuntu 8.04 or later, or 32 bit Debian 5."

How about them fscktards release some .tar.gz's like Mozilla people do?


Be carefull with your words. Will you call them fscktards at their face if they are at the front of you? Everyone seems to forget manner if talking through web now.

Back to topic. They are using deb because they want to utilize auto-update for updating chrome. From TFA: "Installing Google Chrome will add the Google repository so your system will automatically keep Chrome up to date."

I am sure support for other distributions will come. From TFA: "Support for other Linux distributions is planned".

I think it is a good reason to use auto-update from the start. Tgz will just add another mechanism to update, instead of using distro's default auto-update mechanism.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by maaxx
by ba1l on Sat 6th Jun 2009 16:45 in reply to "RE: Comment by maaxx"
ba1l Member since:
2007-09-08

Back to topic. They are using deb because they want to utilize auto-update for updating chrome. From TFA: "Installing Google Chrome will add the Google repository so your system will automatically keep Chrome up to date."


Wow. It seems they really are doing this properly. Excellent.

It does mean that you can't just convert the package to another format using a tool like alien.

Reply Parent Score: 1