Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 12th Jun 2009 18:25 UTC
Debian and its clones Well, this is interesting. We already have a Mono item ruffling some feathers on OSNews today, but here we have the apparent news that Tomboy has become a default part of GNOME on Squeeze, the next release of Debian. Wait, what now? Update: I've updated the article with Fedora's position in all this. Read on! Update II: Josselin Mouette replies.
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50MB?
by twm_bucket on Fri 12th Jun 2009 22:19 UTC
twm_bucket
Member since:
2008-10-09

50 MB for a note taking app? I don't care if it's written in Fortran, that is way, way too much.

Reply Score: 2

RE: 50MB?
by abraxas on Sun 14th Jun 2009 16:28 in reply to "50MB?"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

It's not 50MB. It's 5MB. Mono is much larger but it is an entire language and set of class libraries. Glibc is like 17MB so do you include that 17MB in the calculation of the size of every C application? I don't think so. The Boost libraries are 24MB but I have never heard anyone complain about their size. People making this argument have a hidden anti-Mono agenda. Every argument that seems to come out of the anti-Mono camp isn't an issue exclusive to Mono which makes me believe it is more of an anti-Microsoft viewpoint than any valid complaint about Mono specifically.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: 50MB?
by vivainio on Sun 14th Jun 2009 16:49 in reply to "RE: 50MB?"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Glibc is like 17MB so do you include that 17MB in the calculation of the size of every C application?

glibc is (in practice) always there.

Every argument that seems to come out of the anti-Mono camp isn't an issue exclusive to Mono which makes me believe it is more of an anti-Microsoft viewpoint than any valid complaint about Mono specifically.


Of course it is. I don't think anyone tries to hide the fact that they are concerned about possible future popularity of Mono - i.e., people don't want to give the signal that it's now ok (or even recommended) to develop on Mono, because as it increases in popularity, the potential devastation caused by Microsoft pressing the "kill switch" (or, more probably, "quiet strangulation" switch) will be much larger.

I don't think we should be that badly concerned about this, though. As gnote proves, Mono apps that become successful can be ported to C++ with relative ease, and if C# environment can be used to attract developers to OSS development, so much the better. Think of it as a gateway drug ;-).

Reply Parent Score: 2