Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Jun 2009 13:25 UTC
Apple During last week's Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple introduced a new iPhone model, the iPhone 3GS, which comes, among other things, with a faster processor and more RAM. Since this is a developers' conference, there were also numerous sessions on iPhone development, and the last session was about publishing on the App Store. Since every session at every WWDC is always followed by an open Q&A session, you'd figure this'd be the perfect opportunity for iPhone developers to ask about Apple's App Store policies. Well, no.
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what a sharp contrast
by po134 on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:03 UTC
po134
Member since:
2009-05-15

What a sharp contrast to all microsoft's session I've been where even senior VP go and talk to people (and record it, like with Steven Sinofsky), last time microsoft did something here they had a dev, a server and client person to answers any question we might have for as long as we wanted ... for me that's always the way it should be, listening to the people around your companies, taking notes, creating an open ecosystem (apple has a closed ecosystem, although a great one)

It shocked me to read apple treats their devs that bad, they're the one making a platform successfull or not ... (Guess why ballmer shouted "developper developper developper !!!")

Reply Score: 4

RE: what a sharp contrast
by fretinator on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:11 in reply to "what a sharp contrast"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

I am primarily a Linux dude, but I have also been employed as a Windows developer (VC++, VB Classic, C#, etc). One thing Microsoft has always done well is treat their developer community well. The ISV's are the heart and soul of the Microsoft platform. The only time I remember them mis-treating their developer community was when they axed VB classic. VB.Net is NOT a successor to VB6, it is a totally different platform. They totally dis-respected their VB community.

However, when you decide to do the dance with companies like Apple and Microsoft, you knew who was in control. IMHO, Apple is a MUCH more closed company than Microsoft. I feel like when you buy an Apple product that they are merely "renting" it to you - even the computer itself.

Go Android! Go Moblin!

Reply Parent Score: 10

v RE[2]: what a sharp contrast
by kaiwai on Tue 16th Jun 2009 14:21 in reply to "RE: what a sharp contrast"
RE[2]: what a sharp contrast
by SlackerJack on Tue 16th Jun 2009 16:37 in reply to "RE: what a sharp contrast"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Well yes actually you do. The iPhone doesn't belong to whoever buys it, you're merely rent it. It's the same for their OS's as well, you license it off them rather than own it.

It's a known fact these proprietary companies do such things,(Apple in this case) since you give away your rights and freedom agreeing to their licenses.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: what a sharp contrast
by google_ninja on Tue 16th Jun 2009 21:50 in reply to "RE: what a sharp contrast"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

VB.net is not a successor to VB6, but it is heavily inspired by it.

The thing with VB6 is that it was a horrible mess from both a syntax and an API point of view that you sorta just had to memorize to get anything done in. VB.net is a far better designed platform, and I can't think of a single thing that was removed. I think the big problem was that VB devs were forced to up their game, and really learn OO concepts, which they didn't want to do.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: what a sharp contrast
by rozzy on Tue 16th Jun 2009 18:00 in reply to "what a sharp contrast"
rozzy Member since:
2009-06-16

this was lousy treatment. still I am sure there was a lot of availability by Apple staff through the week.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: what a sharp contrast
by google_ninja on Tue 16th Jun 2009 21:45 in reply to "what a sharp contrast"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

Apple is usually pretty good at this too. Whole product teams are generally scheduled to hang out in hallways at the WWDC. The reason they did this is obvious, they know they are handling the appstore horribly, and didnt want to get raked over the coals.

Reply Parent Score: 2