Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 18th Jun 2009 21:52 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Currently, there's a lot of hype around Android on ARM-based netbooks, a type of netbook arriving later this year. However, despite the obvious choice for Android and other Linux systems, NVIDIA has openly stated their preference for... Windows CE. ARM and Asus are also quite sceptical about Android on ARM netbooks.
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Simple: nVidia hates Linux
by theosib on Fri 19th Jun 2009 02:24 UTC
theosib
Member since:
2006-03-02

nVidia are a very secretive company. They guard their trade secrets with steel bars. Thus, Linux, with constant demands from users to release documentation, have been a thorn in nVidia's side since day one. They hate Linux with a passion and want to see it die.

The only reason they bother to release binary drivers is to shut up the vast majority of Linux users who are content with "good enough", who wouldn't be interested in writing device drivers if they had the opportunity. Now, nVidia only has to deal with a much smaller minority of "whiners" who, from nVidia's perspective, would still be unhappy, even if they did release full chipset documentation.

Interestingly, nVidia's binary drivers are reportedly not nearly as bad as ATI's. Even ATI's most recent Linux drivers are rife with bugs that cause system crashed and data corruption. Fortunately, ATI has wisened up and release documentation, and the Free ATI drivers have gotten to the point where they're really quite usable.

For those who are interested in taking this a step further, google "Open Graphics Project." Their FPGA board is ready to be built, and they've started work on their rendering engine.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Simple: nVidia hates Linux
by lemur2 on Fri 19th Jun 2009 03:16 in reply to "Simple: nVidia hates Linux"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Fortunately, ATI has wisened up and release documentation, and the Free ATI drivers have gotten to the point where they're really quite usable. For those who are interested in taking this a step further, google "Open Graphics Project." Their FPGA board is ready to be built, and they've started work on their rendering engine.


Sadly (or happily depending on your point of view) there doesn't seem to be much point any more to the "Open Graphics Project".

Both the Nouveau Driver project for nVidia cards and the radeon driver project for ATI cards appear to be on track for a release of a fully functional, open source, hardware accelerated, 2D and 3D graphics driver, along with kernel mode setting support, memory management support and much improved integration throughout the entire Xorg stack, by the end of this year.

The Intel open source graphics drivers should be over their difficult transition period by that time also.

The "Open Graphics Project" won't have any chance to compete on that timescale.

Edited 2009-06-19 03:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

saynte Member since:
2007-12-10


Both the Nouveau Driver project for nVidia cards and the radeon driver project for ATI cards appear to be on track for a release of a fully functional, open source, hardware accelerated, 2D and 3D graphics driver, along with kernel mode setting support, memory management support and much improved integration throughout the entire Xorg stack, by the end of this year.


For small values of "on-track" ;) These drivers are not trivial to get right, I think it's not fair to their developers to expect this in such a time-frame. However, your optimism is cute ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 2

Wrawrat Member since:
2005-06-30

Both the Nouveau Driver project for nVidia cards and the radeon driver project for ATI cards appear to be on track for a release of a fully functional, open source, hardware accelerated, 2D and 3D graphics driver, along with kernel mode setting support, memory management support and much improved integration throughout the entire Xorg stack, by the end of this year.


Really? I would be interested to read more on that.

Right now, the radeon driver isn't too bad. I have used it with a Radeon 9250 and it did the job. However, I don't expect a fully-working driver until next year. As for the Nouveau driver, it cannot even render 3D properly; how could it be finished before the end of the year? At least the radeon driver can!

Of course, it depends on your interpretation of "fully functional". When I read this, I am expecting advanced 3D features for chipsets of the current or the previous generation. Complete support for R300 might be cool, but it's useless for newer computers.

Reply Parent Score: 2