Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 23rd Jun 2009 13:31 UTC, submitted by Hakime
Hardware, Embedded Systems The NPD group has done a study into customer satisfaction among netbook buyers, and they came to some surprisingly unsurprising results. As it turns out, people who expected a notebook when they bought a netbook were more likely to be disappointed than buyers who set out to buy a netbook from the get-go. No doodoo, Sherlock.
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Bobthearch
Member since:
2006-01-27

Of course everyone has different computing needs. And naturally the definition of a 'real' computer is an opinion, which I've stated mine.

So you're willing to settle for onboard sound, integrated graphics, and a miniature screen; you self-limit your computer use to low-resource OSes and software; and you know many work-arounds for other shortcomings. My point: you wouldn't have to if it were a 'real' computer.

You've also inadvertently highlighted one of the deficiencies that I listed earlier, expandability. USB mouse, USB keyboard, USB card reader, USB sound card, USB CD/DVD drive, and undoubtedly a printer and scanner too. Toss in USB connections for a calculator, GPS, portable music player, PDA...

Just how many USB plugs would you guess that an Asus Eeepc has? I don't know about the Acer, but the Asus has exactly three. Many/most full-size laptops have at least twice that many, and a 'real' computer could have as many as 8, 10, or maybe 12 in addition to PS/2 plugs for keyboard and mouse.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

You're not getting it. A netbook isn't sitting in the same place all the time, connected to ten million peripherals. Peripherals are plugged in on a need-to-use basis - not on a could-be-used basis. Why on earth would I need to have all those devices plugged in all the time? On a mobile device, no less?

You want too much out of a netbook, and as such, you don't need a netbook. You want it to be something that it simply isn't. I won't buy an iPhone if I want a netbook, and as such, I won't buy a netbook if I want a laptop.

My Acer Aspire One is used as a media player, and thanks to having a Homegroup (go Windows 7, go!), it does the whole media player thing effortlessly. On top of that, I do a lot of OSNews work on my netbook, because I use the device in bed (so OSNews gets maintained before I go to sleep, and right after I wake up).

It does these tasks much more elegantly than my massive 15" PowerBook, exactly because it's so small, cheap, and light.

Reply Parent Score: 4

saimon69 Member since:
2008-10-26

Well, seems that at the end many netbook customers are in fact looking for a quasi-non existent market segment: ultra-cheap notebooks. That was an option I had looked for too, considered my severe lack of cash when my old laptop screen died and now is stuck at home plugged to a monitor.

And i think that, if some companies start to deliver off-the shelf parts to build custom notebooks (in theory possible: we have pci-mini standards for cards and open design cases,standard for optical drives and ssd or hard disks,we just are missing custom laptop mother boards), there is a new whole market segment to explore here.

Simone "Saimon69" Bernacchia

Edited 2009-06-23 18:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I "get it" just fine. I bought one and really like it. But obviously other shoppers don't, thus the high rate of dissatisfaction.

Reply Parent Score: 2

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

So you're willing to settle for onboard sound, integrated graphics, and a miniature screen; you self-limit your computer use to low-resource OSes and software; and you know many work-arounds for other shortcomings. My point: you wouldn't have to if it were a 'real' computer.


On the other hand, you have set a "real computer" up on a pedestal as some sort of all-in-one machine that must have every bell and whistle... Quite sad really.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

On the other hand, you have set a "real computer" up on a pedestal as some sort of all-in-one machine that must have every bell and whistle... Quite sad really.


That's exactly what I expect from a primary computer, an all-in-one machine capable of every function I might envision needing and expandability/upgradability for flexibility of meeting future needs.

That's why a netbook would make a poor primary computer, and anyone who bought one thinking otherwise would be sorely disappointed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Just how many USB plugs would you guess that an Asus Eeepc has? I don't know about the Acer, but the Asus has exactly three. Many/most full-size laptops have at least twice that many, and a 'real' computer could have as many as 8, 10, or maybe 12 in addition to PS/2 plugs for keyboard and mouse.


Damn...did you even use a computer prior to 4 years ago?

My Pentium 4 laptop has exactly 2 USB ports... My Pentium III laptop has exactly 1...

You've somehow managed to mold your brain into the shiny new world of "more is better"...

Reply Parent Score: 4

Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I'm not sure how we got off on this tangent, me having to defend computer capabilities. I'm not big into laptops but yeah, we had a few laptops at work with Pentium 4 processors. They had six USB plugs as I recall, two separate and a stack of 4 on the rear. Good thing too, our software wouldn't run without a USB 'key' inserted, plus we ran a USB drive, printer, and mouse constantly.

Before that USB wasn't as popular. Many peripherals connected through a serial cable, and keyboards and mice almost always had designated PS/2 plugs. Heck, it wasn't that long ago that operating systems didn't really support USB.

Reply Parent Score: 2

polaris20 Member since:
2005-07-06

Of course everyone has different computing needs. And naturally the definition of a 'real' computer is an opinion, which I've stated mine.

So you're willing to settle for onboard sound, integrated graphics, and a miniature screen; you self-limit your computer use to low-resource OSes and software; and you know many work-arounds for other shortcomings. My point: you wouldn't have to if it were a 'real' computer.

You've also inadvertently highlighted one of the deficiencies that I listed earlier, expandability. USB mouse, USB keyboard, USB card reader, USB sound card, USB CD/DVD drive, and undoubtedly a printer and scanner too. Toss in USB connections for a calculator, GPS, portable music player, PDA...

Just how many USB plugs would you guess that an Asus Eeepc has? I don't know about the Acer, but the Asus has exactly three. Many/most full-size laptops have at least twice that many, and a 'real' computer could have as many as 8, 10, or maybe 12 in addition to PS/2 plugs for keyboard and mouse.


So I guess my MacBook Pro isn't a real computer either, since it only has two USB ports. Nevermind the fact that I was a big spender and got a 7-port Belkin hub.

When I get to work in the morning, I plug in one USB port, one MDP plug. That's it. Presto! Instant computer. Before that I guess it was just a calculator.

No offense, sir, but your interpretion of what a "real" computer is is quite skewed, and judging by the other responses in this thread, I am not the only one to think so.

And btw, my iPod Touch is also a computer. It does many things as good or better than "real" computers did just a few short years ago.

Edited 2009-06-23 19:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

viton Member since:
2005-08-09

So you're willing to settle for onboard sound,integrated graphics, and a miniature screen;

I need something mobile (7hr+) and fan-less (ARM based) living at the bottom of my bag/in car. Obviously I don't need external keyboards, VGA/DVI-out, expansion slots etc
I have a laptop + 21" display for everyday work.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

Then it seems like a netbook might be just the thing for you. That's how I use mine too, a portable toy/tool when on the road. Lightweight, inexpensive, and capable of computing at a certain level.

But had you bought a netbook expecting it to be a "desktop replacement" or even a "laptop replacement", you would likely be among the dissatisfied.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Kancept Member since:
2006-01-09

USB mouse, USB keyboard, USB card reader, USB sound card, USB CD/DVD drive, and undoubtedly a printer and scanner too. Toss in USB connections for a calculator, GPS, portable music player, PDA...



I use a bluetooth mouse when I need one. USB sound card? Why? I use a remote CD across my network, but do have a USB DVDRW, not that I use it much at all. Usually only during a program's initial install. Most of my apps are internet downloaded these days anyway. Printer and scanner and card reader are all networked. USB calculator? Why does anyone need to plug in a calculator to use it? My GPS is bluetooth.

My Dell mini9 had 3 USB, and this HP Mini 2140 I'm on has 2. It also has a PCIe 54 slot so I have firewire as well.

Most everything you list is available in wireless options, and you are right, if you stick to wired stuff, you are gonna need a ton of USB connections. iMacs only have 3 or 4 USB connectors as well. Netbooks are designed for the net, which you really don't need to plug into. Many folks have gone wireless for a ton of their peripherals these days anyway, so it's not like USB ports are usually in short supply. Most laptops and notebooks also only have 3-4 USB ports.

Reply Parent Score: 1