Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 25th Jun 2009 21:59 UTC, submitted by JayDee
SkyOS Not too long ago, Robert Szeleney put the development of SkyOS on a temporary hold. The challenges in keeping up with the ever-changing world of hardware support were simply too big to continue SkyOS then-current development model. As a result, Szeleney recently came up with the idea of using a Linux or NetBSD kernel as the base for SkyOS. Well, we've got a progress report on that one, and in true Szeleney fashion, a lot of work has already been done.
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RE[4]: The Point
by sbergman27 on Mon 29th Jun 2009 04:44 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: The Point"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Any proof for your point, sir?

Well, I don't pay a whole lot of attention to the project. But as an OSNews reader I do notice it. They've been working on it for 8 years, and does Haiku really matter in 2009? Is it something I can install for someone and have them be at all happy with it?

"Doomed" is, admittedly, a relative term. But the Haiku project fits at least a few possible interpretations of the word "doomed".

But then again, SkyOS is doomed, as well.

Edited 2009-06-29 04:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: The Point
by umccullough on Mon 29th Jun 2009 18:26 in reply to "RE[4]: The Point"
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

My honest opinion here: You're talking out of your ass.

Well, I don't pay a whole lot of attention to the project. But as an OSNews reader I do notice it.


Which basically translates to: "I only know what I hear from others."

Haiku is quite stable, including on SMP systems... and code doesn't "rot" - in fact Haiku's codebase seems to be more modular and well-designed than most systems out there. I hear new developers coming into the project discussing how surprised they are at how well it's designed and maintained.

They've been working on it for 8 years, and does Haiku really matter in 2009? Is it something I can install for someone and have them be at all happy with it?


I suppose this depends on the person. I've been actually *using* Haiku now for a couple years. Admittedly, it's not the ONLY OS I use, but usable for sure. I think Haiku is not something you're going to be installing for Grandma any time soon (just imagine if you installed Linux for Grandma 10 years ago when it was "8 years old") - but it's *very* usable already, and some claim it makes a hell of a lot more sense for noobs.

"Doomed" is, admittedly, a relative term. But the Haiku project fits at least a few possible interpretations of the word "doomed".

But then again, SkyOS is doomed, as well.


IMO, SkyOS was "doomed" for a different reason - being closed source.

Haiku is as doomed as the users/developers want it to be. If nobody uses it, or nobody develops it, then it will die. On the other hand, if it is both used/developed, then it will live on and remain relevant. That's how open source generally works.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: The Point
by sbergman27 on Mon 29th Jun 2009 18:33 in reply to "RE[5]: The Point"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

think Haiku is not something you're going to be installing for Grandma any time soon (just imagine if you installed Linux for Grandma 10 years ago when it was "8 years old")

But that niche is now filled. By Linux. Now Haiku has to beat Linux or find its own niche.

I would be very surprised to see Haiku or SkyOS gain anywhere near as much public recognition as Linux has now. Especially since they are competeing not on the server, but directly with Microsoft (and Apple, and Linux, and *BSD) on the desktop. They don't even register as also-rans except on niche sites like this one, visited by weird people like us. And it would surprise me if that status changed in the next 10 years.

Edited 2009-06-29 18:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2