Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 29th Jun 2009 14:55 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems With all the talk about Moore's Law, and doomsday predictions of the industry hitting the ceiling of what's possible with regular transistors, you'd almost forget that a lot of people are already thinking about the next revolution in computing: quantum computers. Researchers at Yale have succeeded in producing the first working solid-state quantum processor. Highly intriguing, but way over my head.
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Hackers
by Boomshiki on Tue 30th Jun 2009 01:25 UTC
Boomshiki
Member since:
2008-06-11

This could be bad for security. With the added speed, they could crack systems in minutes that would normally have taken hundreds or thousands on years (in theory)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Hackers
by jack_perry on Tue 30th Jun 2009 05:42 in reply to "Hackers"
jack_perry Member since:
2005-07-06

...unless it takes hundreds or thousands of years to construct quantum computers capable of the computation needed.

Twenty years ago, I read an article saying that flash memory was going to be the next great thing. It finally took off, what, a couple of years ago? and even then we haven't yet replaced hard drives.

Also twenty years ago, fuzzy logic was going to be the next great thing. One guy even wrote a book talking about how it showed the backwardness of Western ways of thinking. A hilarious article in one electronics engineering magazine described a project by a couple of researchers, paid for with a hefty grant from the government (I believe the number was in the millions of dollars), that accomplished what the author could do at the time with $2 worth of analog equipment. I understand that it is used, but it seems (to me) that it was definitely over-hyped at the time. In any case, I'm not sure that after two decades it has yet reached the level of development as flash drives.

So quantum computing may pan out, but I wouldn't hold my breath.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Hackers
by dvzt on Tue 30th Jun 2009 07:41 in reply to "Hackers"
dvzt Member since:
2008-10-23

This could be bad for security. With the added speed, they could crack systems in minutes that would normally have taken hundreds or thousands on years (in theory)


No. We're just going to use bigger encryption keys.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Hackers
by righard on Tue 30th Jun 2009 14:00 in reply to "RE: Hackers"
righard Member since:
2007-12-26

I would be kind of funny if all the advantages of such incredible computer power would be lost because of the need of insanely large encryption keys.

Reply Parent Score: 1