Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 27th Sep 2005 22:40 UTC, submitted by Danijel Orsolic
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "This follow-up to the previously published article 'Ubuntu: Derivative or Fork?' takes into account most of everything that has been posted as a reaction to the first article to present a general opinion and compare them with facts derived from various resouces. You'll see that peace can be achieved between these two, and ultimately any GNU/Linux group out there."
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Anonymous Penguin
Member since:
2005-07-06

"You seem to have a lot of... zeal."

LOL. One of my points is, and I keep reading it more and more often, that this little distro, Kanotix, is really very good and yet it is almost unknown.


"if something doesn't "work" in the open source model, it gets abandoned."

That is very true.

"Love or hate Ubuntu, they seem to be doing something right."

Yes, they have managed to make installing Debian with Xorg and Gnome easier. If they hadn't created incompatibility between Debian's and their own binaries, nowadays everybody would like them.

"I think you're on to something..."

LOL, like what? I won't earn any money by recommending Kanotix. I am just somebody who'd like to see the overall linux standards raised.

Reply Parent Score: 1

rm6990 Member since:
2005-07-04

Yes, they have managed to make installing Debian with Xorg and Gnome easier. If they hadn't created incompatibility between Debian's and their own binaries, nowadays everybody would like them.

Although that may be all Ubuntu itself has done, Ubuntu is essentially a product of the Shuttleworth Foundation. They have invested money in the KDE Education Suite, they have helped poor African schools convert to Free Software to save money and help African students have greater access to computers to improve learning, they are making a distro which is aimed at lowering the costs of mass deployment of desktops at schools worldwide (Edubuntu, which uses a lot of technology from LTSP).

So yes, while Ubuntu itself may only be what you say, the people backing it have done far more for free software than you may think.

Oh, and BTW, Hoary and Sid were compatable until Debian altered their libc which broke compatability. I think it is a bit unfair to ask Ubuntu to break their policy of freezing all packages just because Debian wanted to alter a package in their distro. I suppose Red Hat should break compatability with older, certified apps for their enterprise products everytime their is an ABI change upstream? Why isn't everyone harping on Mandriva for breaking compatability with Red Hat, whom they were originally derived from?

Like I said in an earlier post, Ubuntu has done far more than any other distro that is based on Debian but doesn't track the main repos to ensure compatability. They send their patches to Debian as soon as they are modified, whereas Linspire, for instance, releases a big ISO of source code at every new release, with no disclosure beforehand. Go harp on them.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Anonymous Penguin Member since:
2005-07-06

"Linspire, for instance, releases a big ISO of source code at every new release, with no disclosure beforehand."

We can't really put Linspire into the equation, although I must say that once I dist-upgrade Linspire 5.0 to Sid and I didn't break anything.

For everything else they have done for the poor and the Open Source community, kudos to them, I try to be a fair man.

Reply Parent Score: 0