Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Jul 2009 12:09 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y During the Gran Canaria Desktop Summit, Richard M. Stallman of the Free Software Foundation (and the Superfluous Introduction Award goes to...) gave a keynote speech. Said keynote speech raised a few eyebrows in the Free software community because of a number of questionable remarks regarding women in technology. David "Lefty" Schlesinger, member of the GNOME Advisory Board and active in the mobile open source community, took issue with RMS' remarks and decided to call him out on it. The response he got was... Less than satisfying.
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RE[2]: What an utter non-issue
by xDisruptor on Thu 9th Jul 2009 14:27 UTC in reply to "RE: What an utter non-issue"
xDisruptor
Member since:
2006-01-04

Finally a guy that courageously speaks the truth.

God damn it with most of the rest people in this world. If Stallman is to be flamed for his jokes then what should we do with cases like George Carlin. These dudes are just trying to make some points without sounding dull. Yeah sure Stallman might not be the funniest and most eloquent speakers around but give me a brake guys with your `oh-we-are-so-offended' bullshit. f--king retards. Get a life and a get spine.

Reply Parent Score: 7

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Stallman and Carlin are not remotely in the same league. I can't think of a single Carlin commentary that was gender specific. Stallman has a big brain for technology but is not comparable to the satirical artistry of Carlin. Neither in terms of content or delivery. It's more like Stallman having a Andrew Dice Clay moment; poor delivery and poor choice of content.

If it's no big deal for Stallman, why can't he go "my bad.. bad joke.. sorry for that" and move on? Jokes fail but a good speaker will accept that for what it is, not get evasive and defensive.

Put simply, self deprecating jokes are one thing but when it involves any third party, a joke will be constructive not actively or passively hostile.

Reply Parent Score: 7

FreddyAV Member since:
2009-07-09


If it's no big deal for Stallman, why can't he go "my bad.. bad joke.. sorry for that" and move on? Jokes fail but a good speaker will accept that for what it is, not get evasive and defensive.


100% with you on that one. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

If it's no big deal for Stallman, why can't he go "my bad.. bad joke.. sorry for that" and move on? Jokes fail but a good speaker will accept that for what it is, not get evasive and defensive.


You don't understand what Stallman means when he says " Its no big deal" He means that other people shouldn't be offended. He does think its a valid, funny joke. And thus, he's not going to apologize.

My own opinion is that they are both wrong. Stallman isn't very funny. The whole bit is a long running inside joke, and thus not funny to the people who didn't create it. And viewed from the outside, with out an understanding of Stallman and the joke, it could be mildly offensive to people. But, if those same people were to spend a little time familiarizing themselves with the joke, they should understand that it was not meant to be offensive.

Its like a much less funny version of the "Spring Time for Hitler" sketch from "The Producers". Not meant to be offensive, but could really be offensive.

Reply Parent Score: 8