Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 10th Jul 2009 19:44 UTC, submitted by Moulinneuf
Windows We already more or less confirmed that Microsoft would offer a Windows 7 Home Premium upgrade family pack, with the only missing piece being a more definitive idea on the price. Thanks to a few overeager retailers, we now know that the suggested retail price for the 3-license upgrade pack will be 149 USD, a savings of 210 USD. The family pack is currently not yet available.
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RE[2]: Upgrade?
by lqsh on Fri 10th Jul 2009 21:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Upgrade?"
lqsh
Member since:
2007-01-01

Hopefully you don't need the original install disk, as most PC's don't come with them anymore, and have that damn recovery partition.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Upgrade?
by BlueofRainbow on Sat 11th Jul 2009 01:11 in reply to "RE[2]: Upgrade?"
BlueofRainbow Member since:
2009-01-06

With respect to those systems with a rescue and recovery partition, would the Windows 7 "upgrade" be safe in that it would still allow to restore the system using the recovery partition?

Also, a number of users have now grown used to the presence of such rescue and recovery partition and have become dependent on it or if they are skeptical have the option to make a copy on a set of CDs/DVDs. Would the upgrade have an utility to make a rescue & recovery CD/DVD set?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Upgrade?
by kaiwai on Sat 11th Jul 2009 13:05 in reply to "RE[3]: Upgrade?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

With respect to those systems with a rescue and recovery partition, would the Windows 7 "upgrade" be safe in that it would still allow to restore the system using the recovery partition?

Also, a number of users have now grown used to the presence of such rescue and recovery partition and have become dependent on it or if they are skeptical have the option to make a copy on a set of CDs/DVDs. Would the upgrade have an utility to make a rescue & recovery CD/DVD set?


The problem I have with the rescue partition and DVD's is the fact that there is no option to allow one to pick and choose what to install; in the case of the Toshiba laptop I used to have, you were forced to reinstall the operating system plus all the crapware. If there was an option to select what to restore you would find alot of the anti-restore DVD would die down.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Upgrade?
by darknexus on Sat 11th Jul 2009 17:36 in reply to "RE[3]: Upgrade?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

With respect to those systems with a rescue and recovery partition, would the Windows 7 "upgrade" be safe in that it would still allow to restore the system using the recovery partition?


Yes, if you were simply doing an upgrade from an earlier version your partitions would remain unchanged. Of course, if you used the recovery partition at a later date, you go back to whichever os your system came with initially. If, on the other hand, you do a wipe and install you would have to be careful not to delete the recovery partition or attempt to install Windows 7 overtop of it.

Also, a number of users have now grown used to the presence of such rescue and recovery partition and have become dependent on it


Well, if you say so...

or if they are skeptical have the option to make a copy on a set of CDs/DVDs. Would the upgrade have an utility to make a rescue & recovery CD/DVD set?


Doubt it. You have to realize exactly what these recovery partitions usually are, they are not usually a custom-mastered Windows installation disk. They are typically a partition image (usually Norton Ghost), and often just enough of an os to be able to restore the image (a minimalist os like FreeDOS). The way they are created is simply by imaging a source installation. If you wanted to you could master your own recovery image with Ghost or a similar tool and replace your system's stock recovery partition, but obviously doing this requires you to know what you're doing and is not automatic by any means.

Reply Parent Score: 2