Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Jul 2009 19:02 UTC
Microsoft "The next version of Office moved a step closer to reality on Monday as Microsoft released an invitation-only technical preview of Office 2010. However, the release of the software will be limited. Attendees of this week's Worldwide Partner Conference in New Orleans, as well as the recent TechEd show, will gain access to the desktop versions of Office 2010." More here.
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Access continues to be destroyed
by arbour42 on Mon 13th Jul 2009 21:12 UTC
arbour42
Member since:
2005-07-06

It looks like Microsoft is continuing to strangle Access. In 2007, they emasculated it so badly that I told my clients upgrading from 2003 wasn't worth it, since the 2007 version actually took away key features. It was also plain awful to develop with.

I'm guessing they are trying to force people onto SQL Server and .NET, though .NET has awful db controls compared to Access (including .Net 4 now in beta).

And the Ribbon is still awful, tailor-made for our ADHD culture.

Reply Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

It looks like Microsoft is continuing to strangle Access. In 2007, they emasculated it so badly that I told my clients...

Please refrain from posting such sexist comments on OSNews. It's impolite, and there could be virgins here.

Reply Parent Score: 5

chekr Member since:
2005-11-05

Please refrain from posting such sexist comments on OSNews. It's impolite, and there could be virgins here.


+1 for you! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

OSGuy Member since:
2006-01-01

Edited...

Edited 2009-07-13 21:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

This is the first time I have EVER heard anyone say something nice about access. BerkleyDB, SQLite, Firebird, hell, even FoxPro is better options then Access.

And name one thing about ribbon being worse then menus, outside of being slightly bigger.

Reply Parent Score: 2

arbour42 Member since:
2005-07-06

For what it does, Access is very powerful for department-level solutions. It allows extremely fast UI and Report development, and gives the user an easy ability to build ad-hoc queries. I've used it since '94 and you cannot build similar front-ends using ANY web technologies today - javascript, flex, silverlight, javafx. A couple of JS libraries are getting there, but still have a good way to go.

The only db front-end builder that is better is Delphi. Nothing in the open-source world, or in Microsoft's .NET world, comes close to either of these.

Also, FoxPro was bought by Microsoft so that Access 2.0 could use Foxpro's query engine. I know fellows still using Foxpro today. I also greatly enjoyed Paradox. If Corel would only open-source it, I would use it immediately.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

BerkleyDB, SQLite, Firebird, hell, even FoxPro is better options then Access.


On technical merit, yes. In practical use, no.
Access gets the job done for most people. Admittedly it gets the job done in a horrible way that's an affront to good design but nevertheless, it gets it done.
Or at least it used to. With these new versions that's not necessarily true anymore.

Edited 2009-07-14 04:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

ba1l Member since:
2007-09-08

This is the first time I have EVER heard anyone say something nice about access. BerkleyDB, SQLite, Firebird, hell, even FoxPro is better options then Access.


If by "Access" you mean the database engine, then I'd agree. It's slow, unreliable, has absolutely terrible performance with concurrent users, is nearly unusable over a network, and has a completely useless security model.

That said... BerkleyDB is fast and reliable, but isn't comparable with Access, since it's not a relational database. SQLite is, again, fast and reliable, but lacks referential integrity constraints, treats field types as nothing more than a guideline, and inherits the same problems inherent to any file-based database - poor concurrency, and no security model.

Other than the database engine, the only bad thing about Access (aside from being nearly unmaintained for 10 years) is much the same as the main problem with PHP. It's easy enough to use that people with no idea what they're doing can build something that works. It'll make a hell of a mess when it eventually breaks on them, of course - that's the point most IT professionals will first get to see the Access database that contains vital business data, but is now completely broken.

As a database front-end, if you know what you're doing with it, it's actually pretty decent.

For example, you can ignore the Access database engine entirely, and connect to any real database server you like using ODBC, including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Microsoft's SQL Server Express, and probably more.

Of course, someone who does know what they're doing could probably build a better UI on another platform, but it'd take them longer, and giving the users the ability to do ad-hoc queries and reports (which they will invariably want to do) would be a huge undertaking.

Edited 2009-07-14 14:51 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1