Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Jul 2009 16:09 UTC
Linux One of the problem with operating system updates is that you often need to reboot the system. While this is nothing but a minor nuisance for us desktop users, it's a bigger problem when it comes to servers. Ksplice is a technology that allows Linux kernel patches to be applied without actually restarting the kernel.
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Already in NT.
by PlatformAgnostic on Wed 15th Jul 2009 17:58 UTC
PlatformAgnostic
Member since:
2006-01-02

NT has had this capability on all supported architectures since Win2K3 SP1 for both user-mode and kernel-mode components.

I'm not sure it's that useful because any installation which has high enough reliability requirements to use hotpatching probably organizes its services in a cluster which can be patched through more normal mechanisms without downtime.

The code that makes this work is kinda cool though, so I can see why it was developed ;) .

Reply Score: 3

RE: Already in NT.
by bogomipz on Wed 15th Jul 2009 19:50 in reply to "Already in NT."
bogomipz Member since:
2005-07-11

Except on NT you probably need to reboot to install the new components in the first place because files are in use and are therefore locked (which is a major design flaw in NT compared to *nix systems).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Already in NT.
by kaiwai on Thu 16th Jul 2009 01:12 in reply to "RE: Already in NT."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Except on NT you probably need to reboot to install the new components in the first place because files are in use and are therefore locked (which is a major design flaw in NT compared to *nix systems).


That is the one thing I hate about Windows - the stupid idea of locking files; who ever designed such a stupid principle needs to be fired from Microsoft because it lacks all degree of common sense. It not only effects the kernel but try uninstalling applications where the application fails to unload the shared libraries resulting in locked files that results in a whole heap of crap left over when uninstalling.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Already in NT.
by cetp on Thu 16th Jul 2009 09:51 in reply to "RE: Already in NT."
cetp Member since:
2007-12-16
RE: Already in NT.
by panzi on Wed 15th Jul 2009 22:22 in reply to "Already in NT."
panzi Member since:
2006-01-22

Why is it then that Windows till needs to reboot more often than Linux? (Just felt reboots. Dunno if its the real amount of reboots.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Already in NT.
by smashIt on Wed 15th Jul 2009 22:33 in reply to "RE: Already in NT."
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

you have to differentiate between needing to reboot and beeing prompted to reboot

most of the apps/drivers that finish the install-process with a reboot-message just work after clicking NO

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Already in NT.
by Soulbender on Thu 16th Jul 2009 07:06 in reply to "Already in NT."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I'm not sure it's that useful because any installation which has high enough reliability requirements to use hotpatching probably organizes its services in a cluster which can be patched through more normal mechanisms without downtime.


Right on. Either a service is so important that it is already in a failover or cluster configuration and rebooting is not a problem or it's just not important enough and then rebooting isn't a problem either.

Reply Parent Score: 2