Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Jul 2009 19:16 UTC
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris The Linux desktop has come a long way. It's a fully usable, stable, and secure operating system that can be used quite easily by the masses. Not too long ago, Sun figured they could do the same by starting Project Indiana, which is supposed to deliver a complete distribution of OpenSolaris in a manner similar to GNU/Linux. After using the latest version for a while, I'm wondering: why?
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binarycrusader
Member since:
2005-07-06

"
Except it isn't, because OpenSolaris fully integrates additional OS-specific functionality into the "same desktop and applications." For example, because of zfs, GNOME Nautilus has a time slider feature that is not present on GNU/Linux distributions.


Would you mind providing other examples for OpenSolaris features directly included in the GNOME ui, except for Time Slider? This is one of the main complaints I (still?) have to make about it - there's next to nothing on the desktop which is "unique OpenSolaris"... except for Time Slider, maybe, which also just recently has been included...
K.
"

If by GNOME UI, you mean GNOME desktop applications, then:

Another example would be the Package Manager, which has support for OpenSolaris' unique Boot Environments technology.

This allows a user to create and manage boot environments.

Boot environments allow a user to upgrade a "copy" of their currently running system instead of the live system itself preventing the update process from destabilising currently running applications.

If the new boot environment fails (because of some bugs specific to their hardware perhaps), or a new version of their application doesn't work right, users can simply go back to the old boot environment without losing productivity.

If by GNOME UI, you mean the standard GNOME programs itself?

Here are some examples:

* The GNOME volume control applet has been specifically enhanced to take advantage of and use features found in the new boomer audio subsystem

* In the very near future, the Shutdown dialog for GNOME will be enhanced to allow the user to choose between a 'Fast Reboot' which causes the OpenSolaris kernel to reload itself without causing the system to reset (which avoids having to wait for the BIOS POST process, etc.) and a 'Restart' which physically restarts the system.

* The GNOME 'Users And Groups' application was enhanced to allow assignment of OpenSolaris' roles and profiles security attributes.

* The network administration control panel of GNOME was enhanced to allow access to OpenSolaris-specific network technologies such as network profiles (even more enhancements are coming in the future).

* A special 'services' application was added that allows management of OpenSolaris SMF-based services.

There are probably other areas as well that I've missed, but that should give you an idea...

Reply Parent Score: 2

kawazu Member since:
2005-12-11


If by GNOME UI, you mean GNOME desktop applications, then:

Another example would be the Package Manager, which has support for OpenSolaris' unique Boot Environments technology.


The package manager indeed is unique inasmuch as that it works with the OpenSolaris IPS packaging system. In terms of usability or even speed, however, so far it is not even close to in example synaptic on a Debian derivative. Mainly, it's way too slow for that.



...
Boot environments allow a user to upgrade a "copy" of their currently running system instead of the live system itself preventing the update process from destabilising currently running applications.
...


Yes, the BE feature is pretty cool, even though this is also something I way more want to have on a server on which I have way stricter downtime considerations to do.



Here are some examples:

* The GNOME volume control applet has been specifically enhanced to take advantage of and use features found in the new boomer audio subsystem


Thanks for the pointer, I will have a look at this. ;) So far however, on OpenSolaris my notebook was quiet at the moment anyhow because, even though the audio drivers listed my machine as "supported", they somehow simply didn't work for whichever reasons. Gonna see whether the new builds still show this problem.

Asides this, so far I have no comparison of boomer and the GNU/Linux ALSA architecture in terms of features and/or UI support.



* In the very near future, the Shutdown dialog for GNOME will be enhanced to allow the user to choose between a 'Fast Reboot' which causes the OpenSolaris kernel to reload itself without causing the system to reset (which avoids having to wait for the BIOS POST process, etc.) and a 'Restart' which physically restarts the system.


Cool. ;) Next thing, however, would be to have these things generally available independent of the GNOME desktop. Most of my Unix using developer friends use KDE for good reasons, and I personally use XFCE both because of its overally "lighter" memory footprint and because of nostalgic issues (it reminds me of CDE, simply put... ;) ). So far, the GNU/Linux distributions more and more provide infrastructure to expose features like this independent of the actual desktop environment used...


* The GNOME 'Users And Groups' application was enhanced to allow assignment of OpenSolaris' roles and profiles security attributes.


Ok. This is a good point.



* The network administration control panel of GNOME was enhanced to allow access to OpenSolaris-specific network technologies such as network profiles (even more enhancements are coming in the future).


This is cool but at the moment I just would be happy if I could use the OpenSolaris network connection control to connect my notebook with our WLAN without too much pain. In Xubuntu, this is a matter of having all the data at hand and spending a minute using nm-applet or wicd or whatever. On OpenSolaris, the last time it took me half a day and by now all I came up with was a half-baked scripted solution not working out of the box in a sane way. Didn't even try doing UMTS dialup via bluetooth, so far...


* A special 'services' application was added that allows management of OpenSolaris SMF-based services.


Not too different to the GNOME service manager on other platforms however.



There are probably other areas as well that I've missed, but that should give you an idea...


Yes it does, thanks! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1