Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Jul 2009 09:50 UTC, submitted by kragil
Debian and its clones Most mainstream distributions, like Ubuntu, Fedora, and Mandriva, have already adopted a time-based release schedule, meaning that releases are not done on a feature basis, but according to a pre-determined time schedule. The Debian project has announced that it has adopted a time-based release schedule too.
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Redeeman
Member since:
2006-03-23

Honestly the erratic release cycle of debian is the largest hurdle keeping me away from it.

Yes.. because.. how would you EVER be able to sleep not knowing if you were to upgrade the software on your computers in april or july? oh teh horror!

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Yes.. because.. how would you EVER be able to sleep not knowing if you were to upgrade the software on your computers in april or july? oh teh horror!

Or in Debian's case, *which* April or July. This matters for corporate desktops. I know. I administer them. And Debian's cavalier attitude toward release planning is the #1 reason that we don't even consider using it.

Edited 2009-07-29 15:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Do you really administer Corporate Linux Destops? That's awesome. Which distro do you use then? Red hat releases are pretty slow. As are Suse ( last I checked, has this changed?). Ubuntu seems to be the most regular releases of something that might be installed on a corporate desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Redeeman Member since:
2006-03-23

"Yes.. because.. how would you EVER be able to sleep not knowing if you were to upgrade the software on your computers in april or july? oh teh horror!

Or in Debian's case, *which* April or July. This matters for corporate desktops. I know. I administer them. And Debian's cavalier attitude toward release planning is the #1 reason that we don't even consider using it.
"
no, it doesnt really matter to corporate desktops, unless ofcourse you need something to occupy yourself with and thus feel like upgrading peoples desktops very regularly?

Reply Parent Score: 3

kenji Member since:
2009-04-08

My point was perhaps not clear. I was more pointing towards the length of time between releases and the variability of that time from one release to another.

Although it's true that a large majority of desktop linux users care about having the latest apps, I am more concerned in the case of Debian with hardware support. Stable releases use old kernels right out of the gate and then 18 months later...they are even older.

I build my own computers so a fairly recent kernel is important to me but it comes down to personal preference. Hardware support IS important to me afterall....

Reply Parent Score: 1