Linked by Jordan Spencer Cunningham on Sat 1st Aug 2009 17:48 UTC
Internet & Networking "Linux: If a lack of third-party plug-in support (i.e. Flash) kept you from trying out Chrome on your Linux system, then avoid no longer. The 'early developer version' now supports many plug-ins, and they seem to work pretty well. You'll need to add --enable-plugins to your Chrome shortcut's command line operation to get the 'buggy' plug-in support, but it seems worth the hassle, as YouTube videos are playing relatively stable and smooth. Google's updated their alpha-level Chrome builds to include the newest start page tweaks as well, and it's generally a browser worth checking out, even if a few standard settings and convenience items are still missing."
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terminal services plug-in
by Different on Sun 2nd Aug 2009 08:19 UTC
Different
Member since:
2007-07-03

Hi,

Does it have a RDP plug-in. I'm planning to connect it to Windows server such as ThinServer

http://www.aikotech.com/thinserver.htm

Reply Score: -1

RE: terminal services plug-in
by Laurence on Sun 2nd Aug 2009 13:12 in reply to "terminal services plug-in"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Hi,

Does it have a RDP plug-in. I'm planning to connect it to Windows server such as ThinServer

http://www.aikotech.com/thinserver.htm


Why not just use an RDP client then?

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

While we're sort of on the topic... anyone know of a Windows Terminal Services client for Linux (doesn't have to be a browser plugin) which handles Windows 2008 Server's proxy via http/https capability? rdesktop does not.

Reply Parent Score: 2