Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 4th Aug 2009 10:43 UTC
SuSE, openSUSE SUSE Linux used to be a very KDE-centric distribution. Then Novell came around, bought SUSE and Ximian, and slowely but surely they turned the now-openSUSE distribution into effectively a GNOME-centric distribution with KDE as its sidekick. The openSUSE community, however, doesn't appear to be particularly happy with KDE being a sidekick.
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KugelKurt
Member since:
2005-07-06

The reduction in distributor commitment to KDE has made me sad for years now.

That's totally false. Distributor support was not reduced, but rather shifted.
Pardus is a relatively new distro that fully supports KDE. Western users may not have heard about it. It's a Turkish distro. Several people work full time on it.
KDE also has a great reputation on Arch with KDEmod.

I have had trouble with bugs under Kubuntu's KDE but I'm hesitant to blame too many of these on the distro given the hacked-about nature of my ancient install.

No, it really is Kubuntu to blame. Kubuntu has the buggiest KDE packages I know of. No Kubuntu release ever shipped with non-broken translation files for KDE. KDE also is less stable there.

Reply Parent Score: 7

Mark Williamson Member since:
2005-07-06

"The reduction in distributor commitment to KDE has made me sad for years now.

That's totally false. Distributor support was not reduced, but rather shifted.
"

Well, you may disagree but I really meant that total distributor resources seem to have reduced. There are smaller distros providing a good KDE experience, which is good, it's just a shame that the really big financial backers of the project seem to have switched resources to GNOME to a greater or lesser extent.


Pardus is a relatively new distro that fully supports KDE. Western users may not have heard about it. It's a Turkish distro. Several people work full time on it.
KDE also has a great reputation on Arch with KDEmod.


I've heard good stuff about Pardus, yeah.


"I have had trouble with bugs under Kubuntu's KDE but I'm hesitant to blame too many of these on the distro given the hacked-about nature of my ancient install.

No, it really is Kubuntu to blame. Kubuntu has the buggiest KDE packages I know of. No Kubuntu release ever shipped with non-broken translation files for KDE. KDE also is less stable there.
"

Right. I seem to recall, quite early on, a (the?) lead Kubuntu developer complaining about the lack of commitment from the Canonical mothership, so I've always had the impression they were somewhat overworked / understaffed.

I've seen various visual problems I see with my KDE4 also blamed on Kubuntu's version of the packages.

I have been considering using Konstruct to build KDE from source, rather than rely on their packaged version. I wonder if it's becoming worth it.

Can't afford to reinstall my desktop machine right now but on my netbook I run Mandriva - it's a heavy distro in RAM usage and disk usage (not ideal for a netbook) but it has a good KDE and excellent support for that hardware. I couldn't run Mandriva on my desktop though, it seems to have packages for too few of the apps I'm interested in.

I used to run KDE on Fedora using RPMs from the KDE-Redhat project and found that reasonable. The main awkwardness about Fedora in those days was that I couldn't figure out a way to enable MP3 support under KDE *without* using the kde-redhat RPMs. The other thing which niggled was that all of the config software they provided was GNOME-based, although it did have the nice feature of being usable on the terminal too.

Reply Parent Score: 2

KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, you may disagree but I really meant that total distributor resources seem to have reduced. There are smaller distros providing a good KDE experience, which is good, it's just a shame that the really big financial backers of the project seem to have switched resources to GNOME to a greater or lesser extent.

When Novell acquired SUSE and Ximian, no resources were shifted away from KDE towards GNOME.
The current GNOME team is mostly the same as the old Ximian team -- located in the USA.
The KDE team is basically the same as the old SUSE desktop team -- located in Germany and the Czech Republic.
When Novell laid off personnel a few months ago, I think the GNOME team was even hit harder than the KDE team. If I'm right, from the KDE team only Stephan Binner had to go, while from the GNOME team Hubert Figure and another one were affected (my info could be wrong, I might add).

Red Hat never really supported KDE. AFAIK they employ one person that makes sure the packages make it into Fedora, but that's about it.

I have no idea what the current amount of Mandriva contributions is. I know that one Mandiva guy works on Kopete. Due economic pressure on the company, Mandriva may have shifted some KDE resources to GNOME in order to have a wider audience.

Canonical may have quite a lot mindshare with Ubuntu, but their actual contributions are not that big. It improved in the last few months, though. GNOME AFAIK has an advantage in man power there.

That however should be compensated by Pardus' and PC-BSD's KDE devs.

What you are forgetting is Nokia. Nokia started to be a GNOME contributor with Maemo. Then Nokia bought Trolltech and more and more resources were shifted towards Qt development which peaked in the announcement to switch Maemo to Qt. That in turn helps KDE.

Overall both KDE's and GNOME's developer base is increasing steadily. Both communities are in extremely good shape

Reply Parent Score: 2