Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 5th Aug 2009 19:37 UTC
Apple Using his blue box, Steve Wozniak once called the Vatican (for free), and, imitating Henry Kissinger's voice, asked if he could speak with the pope. The pope turned out to be asleep. Wozniak pulled these pranks together with Steve Jobs, with whom he'd found Apple computer not long after. Oh, how the times have changed. How can a company with its roots in phreaking, pranks, and home-made computing end up the way it is today?
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RE[2]: Different perspective
by Tom K on Wed 5th Aug 2009 22:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Different perspective"
Tom K
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not attacking. You're perfectly accurate about human nature, and there being some degree of emotion to everything we do or say -- you just proved that, by getting your panties all up in a knot about my comment. :-)

Look, I like my iPhone. It pleases me to keep its case and screen clean. I like using it. I'd be pretty devastated if I lost or broke it. That's definitely a level of emotional attachment -- and I'm not ashamed to admit it. There are people out there who have shed themselves of all emotional attachment to physical possessions, but I myself have not reached that level of enlightenment or whatever you want to call it.

On the other hand, I don't look to Apple (or my iPhone, or MacBook Pro) to fill my heart with longing, or provide some kind of spiritual or emotional satisfaction. Spiritual and emotional satisfaction/attachment I find in people who are close to me, and by travelling and seeing new things and observing how different cultures or groups of people behave.

I look at Apple as a company that makes some great products -- products that are easy to get attached to, but all in all, mass-produced products that are replaceable.

PS: Don't you dare lecture me about not seeing the finer details in life. You don't know me. What was that about being belittling?

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[3]: Different perspective
by Tom K on Wed 5th Aug 2009 22:45 in reply to "RE[2]: Different perspective"
Tom K Member since:
2005-07-06

Also, there is no issue with anyone liking or disliking a company. "Liking" something is not akin to looking to it for emotional fulfillment, though.

I have nothing against Thom. I was simply pointing out that some people's attachment to Apple is a little bit ridiculous at times. They are not a religion, and they're only selling pretty boxes that do things -- nothing more, nothing less. I think some Internet nerds often forget this.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Different perspective
by molnarcs on Thu 6th Aug 2009 07:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Different perspective"
molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

Look, you did quote him out of context, and the only purpose your post served was to ridicule someone who wrote an opinion piece. In fact, you are still at it:

On the other hand, I don't look to Apple (or my iPhone, or MacBook Pro) to fill my heart with longing, or provide some kind of spiritual or emotional satisfaction. Spiritual and emotional satisfaction/attachment I find in people who are close to me, and by travelling and seeing new things and observing how different cultures or groups of people behave.


As opposed to Thom? Are you suggesting that unlike you, Thom's sole source of spiritual/emotional satisfaction is Apple or objects in general? It takes a great deal of ill will to twist the meaning of what he wrote to serve your purpose... which still seems to be the same I pointed out.

PS: Don't you dare lecture me about not seeing the finer details in life. You don't know me. What was that about being belittling?

Look, I'm sorry about that, it was a bit overboard. At that time I thought you were a teenager - being a teacher, I routinely lecture them. Still, obviously you're not, and I apologize. (Ok, that was a snide remark too) The point is, that I did exactly what you did and for that, a do feel some regret. Otherwise, 99% of us don't know shit about each other (no need to point out the obvious there), and yet, some of chose to ridicule others by deliberately twisting the meaning of what they wrote. Sad but true. Deal with it. And the occasional consequences.

Reply Parent Score: 1

wanker90210 Member since:
2007-10-26

If I buy an expensive iPhone and cannot use it the way I want or was promised I could do, I get pretty emotional about it. Not necessarily in the Amiga Zealot way, but that I just wasted a lot of money.

Things like this Apple Bashing 1984 initiative does give Apple an idea of what people are annoyed with and a business incentive to change it (more sales). Sending emails to bigboss@apple.com will be read by a secretary and then deleted.

I do hope the 1984-thread will contain concrete arguments rather than emotional, otherwise I think it will be ignored. USA based companies, perhaps more than in other places, will look at alternatives and if path B leads to bigger revenue than A, path B will be chosen.

I use MacOS, Linux and Windows everyday and I tend to lean towards Mac because it's a trouble free (relatively) environment to work in. For the same reason I tend to like NetBeans over Eclipse. The day the trouble of using Mac > other platform, Apple will loose me as a customer. For me (self employed programmer) this is strictly a business decision. I do think Microsoft is a better company for us programmers, but that the Apple machines offers higher productivity (my MBP has for example the first usable touchpad I've ever used and has MacOS is a solid UN*X with more or less the same commercial programs as Windows where it counts for me).

Reply Parent Score: 1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

bcc bigbossA, bigbossB, bigbossC....

hehe.. the trick would be getting the email list together then sending the blast without setting off spam filtering. I know I've come close to including a few extra managers on email to the rep I'm dealing with in a few cases.

Reply Parent Score: 2