Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 9th Aug 2009 20:49 UTC
Windows While the tech media are all busy praising Windows 7, the operating system still obviously does have issues, it being Windows and all. Because we are talking about Windows, and not, say Ubuntu or Mac OS X, it comes with one big downside that will mostly hit new users of Windows 7 (meaning, everyone): the incredibly complicated upgrade paths.
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Looks clear enough
by twm_bucket on Sun 9th Aug 2009 22:18 UTC
twm_bucket
Member since:
2008-10-09

The table seems easy enough to read. Find your version of Windows. Read straight across to see your options. Doesn't seem that hard.

I use Windows Vista because of the apps I need. Vista is very stable and easy to use. And this is someone who hasn't used Windows since 3.11.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Looks clear enough
by sbergman27 on Sun 9th Aug 2009 22:34 in reply to "Looks clear enough"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

The table seems easy enough to read. Find your version of Windows. Read straight across to see your options. Doesn't seem that hard.

Or you can just use this handy rule of thumb:

80% of the time the answer is "no".

And in the remaining 20% of cases... well... is there a written guarantee somewhere?

My only other reliable source in such matters says: "Reply hazy. Try again".

Edited 2009-08-09 22:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Looks clear enough
by Eddyspeeder on Mon 10th Aug 2009 08:38 in reply to "RE: Looks clear enough"
Eddyspeeder Member since:
2006-05-10

Ummm complicated? Isn't it as easy as:

Vista Home > 7 Home Premium
Vista Business > 7 Professional
Vista Home/Business/Ultimate > 7 Ultimate

Except: when you switch between 32 and 64 bit.

All else: custom install.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Looks clear enough
by drewunwired on Sun 9th Aug 2009 22:49 in reply to "Looks clear enough"
drewunwired Member since:
2005-07-06

The table seems easy enough to read. Find your version of Windows. Read straight across to see your options. Doesn't seem that hard.

I don't think the problem is so much that the table exists, but rather the mere fact that such a table even needs to exist. Because Microsoft has so many different SKUs of both Vista and 7, there are something like 30 different "upgrade" paths (in regions where the K and/or N editions exist) from Vista to 7. As a result, there are far too many options.

With Mac OS X and most distributions of Linux, your options are dreadfully simple: desktop or server editions.

With Vista in the US, you have Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate. The general rule seems to be that you can upgrade like to like or like to Ultimate, but you can't go from Business to Home or vice versa, nor can you go from Home Basic to anything. Enterprise users will probably just deploy new hardware, so none of this matters.

The problem with this is that it's taken me 1000 characters to explain something which should be able to be done in two sentences: If you're running version N-1, you can upgrade to the same architecture (32/64 bit) of version N. If you're running older than version N-1, you have to do a full install.

Of course, in a perfect world, Microsoft would steal one from Apple's book and render the whole architecture discussion moot by releasing all architectures on one disc, but we can't have everything... ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2