Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 12th Aug 2009 17:55 UTC, submitted by Laurence
Legal In what some will undoubtedly call ironic, Microsoft has been declared guilty of wilfully infringing upon an XML patent held by the Canadian company i4i. The judge has ordered Microsoft to pay a fine of 290 million USD, and has barred Microsoft from selling Word in the United States if the company doesn't comply within 60 days (a detail omitted by many). Microsoft has already announced it will appeal the judge's decision.
Thread beginning with comment 378315
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: They aren't patent trolls
by Beta on Thu 13th Aug 2009 07:33 UTC in reply to "They aren't patent trolls"
Beta
Member since:
2005-07-06

i4i don't appear to be patent trolls to me. They actually have several products regarding document management and conversion that appear popular in the pharmaceuticals industry.

They have software that works from within Word to create and use XML document templates.

Fairly sure I read something a while back about i4i approaching Microsoft with XML processing technology (I assume for product licensing) and they claimed that MS took the idea and built it straight into Office.

This is more about i4i keeping Microsoft from stealing their business. I4i have large government contracts already, but with most governments having MS agreements (cheap multiseat licensing), their product is unfortunately in a position where its extra expense.

Seems a bit sad that we’re soo focused on patent trolling we don’t actually notice real cases where a company has wilfully, and totally to character, taken a methodology of someone elses.

nb: not a patent fan.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: They aren't patent trolls
by Rehdon on Thu 13th Aug 2009 09:25 in reply to "RE: They aren't patent trolls"
Rehdon Member since:
2005-07-06

Fairly sure I read something a while back about i4i approaching Microsoft with XML processing technology (I assume for product licensing) and they claimed that MS took the idea and built it straight into Office.


I wouldn't be surprised in the least, I still remember the Burst.com case:

http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/2002/pulpit_20020620_000736.html
http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/2003/pulpit_20030828_000447.html

They used to do this sort of tricks in the past, it took a lot of litigation and losing the antitrust suit to sort of mend their ways.

Rehdon

Reply Parent Score: 2