Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 15th Aug 2009 17:55 UTC
X11, Window Managers Over the past couple of months, and especially over the past couple of weeks, I've been working very hard to write and complete my thesis. I performed all the work on Windows 7, but now that the thesis is finally done, submitted, and accepted, I installed Ubuntu - and immediately I was reminded of why I do not do any serious work on Linux: the train wreck that is X.org.
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RE: To Bryan
by ciplogic on Sun 16th Aug 2009 11:21 UTC in reply to "To Bryan"
ciplogic
Member since:
2006-12-22

Any OS/software have bugs and crashes.

When Chrome starts with multiprocess architecture, Thom will need to write a rant that how can anyone survive losing data when a flash plugin crash.

Robustness of a process and the relation of other applications with it is not necessarily the right concern. What if Outlook crash or Word crash and the database/file you work on becomes corrupt? Being a bit more robust on restarting their windowing system means nothing in real life. Buying a tested Linux hardware configuration to have your experience smooth (as is offered by Dell) will not make you worry about restarting your drivers configuration.

Also, this "robustness" come with a price. Linux can run smooth on a nettop, and the equivalent counterpart, WinXP will break in the same way as does Linux.

Windows also have a huge garbage of software that makes your system sluggish, unstable and sometimes unusable, mostly if you download small tools from internet.

I would like to see a counter rant that Microsoft do not have a nice way to make in one interface updating of your entire software as Linux do it for more than 5 years in almost any distribution with an GUI. It is really not acceptable for year 2010 we're in! Or a way that when you click on a site that needs a codec, to show to you which codec do you need after an internet search-up. And I don't mean those popups that say that your computer is in danger and you need to get a lot of scamware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: To Bryan
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 16th Aug 2009 11:24 in reply to "RE: To Bryan"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I would like to see a counter rant that Microsoft do not have a nice way to make in one interface updating of your entire software as Linux do it for more than 5 years in almost any distribution with an GUI. It is really not acceptable for year 2010 we're in!


You mean like this?

http://www.osnews.com/story/19711/The_Utopia_of_Program_Management
http://www.osnews.com/story/21135/Blind_or_Deaf_Program_Management_...
http://www.osnews.com/story/21714/Blind_or_Deaf_Program_Management_...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: To Bryan
by ciplogic on Sun 16th Aug 2009 11:45 in reply to "RE[2]: To Bryan"
ciplogic Member since:
2006-12-22

Mea culpa, you have right those are written, but the point was another: your bad computer experience with Linux to mean that a specific piece of code is bad.

The point was this: you shown an use-case that fails on your machine. It is annoying for sure. In most normal case the video driver crash should not happen.

For me going to Windows I have in tray some popups announcing me that there is a software update for Adobe Reader or Java, some other updates go through Windows update, etc. When there is an exploit go in the wild for Windows is mostly happen because the user do not upgrade it's software stack (mostly Flash). I use mostly Fedora on a my netbook and laptop and Ubuntu on desktop (you have right: I pick this combination for the best video driver stability), I know that updates are only a matter of going one application, no annoying popup, etc.

Showing an use case that annoy an user (like using data because of data corruption, video drivers problems) on any OS should be done in a way that don't appear from outside as an anti-X/anti-Linux FUD. I am not sure if you intend it, but this is how it looks by far.

I did worked with RHEL and Linux driver stack for an air traffic controller software and the drivers are guaranteed to not crash for at least 2 years (we used nVidia Quadro configurations). The entire software stack should not let the machine off more than 2-3 minute per year for entire controlling system (meaning for 10 machines), so they really work (almost) flawless. Because 2-3 minutes does not mean only video driver freeze, can mean network problems, memory leaks, etc.

And for them Windows (I talk about client software, no server) was out of the options. Either 2K, XP or Vista. The alternate OS could be only Solaris.

Reply Parent Score: 1