Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 17th Aug 2009 16:07 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Linux We already discussed David Finch, Dell's senior product marketing manager for Linux clients, last week. We missed, however, some more interesting statements by Finch; Dell is looking into the ARM-based netbook smartbook market, and close to a third of all of Dell's netbooks ship with Linux.
Thread beginning with comment 379047
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
I do not really get this
by midoriconcept on Mon 17th Aug 2009 16:45 UTC
midoriconcept
Member since:
2006-12-01

I really have some issues understanding the Dell's strategy on Linux.
First they say they support Linux, but on their web site (at least for dell.it) the inspiron Mini 10v (linux and 8 gb SSD) costs 249 euros.
If I want a decent hard disk you need to pay 279 euros, with 160 gb, but only Windows... uhm..

Basically even if I want to buy a Dell with Linux I need to buy the smaller capacity. Or buy the Windows version and install linux.

This 30 euros of difference what are they? License or Harddisk?

Does not make any sense.

I think is not just dell, Also other manufactures do this.

I still need to find someone that does a proper offer.. Same specs, different operating system. . .

Reply Score: 1

RE: I do not really get this
by jebb on Mon 17th Aug 2009 17:41 in reply to "I do not really get this"
jebb Member since:
2006-07-06

Just having a look (on the UK website), it seems like it is now possible to choose the 10v with Ubuntu, and choose a 160GB hard drive in the personnalisation options. It then comes at £238.99, whereas the XP machine with the same hard drive is £249. So there you have it: XP is worth a grand total of £10.01 a pop.

I still think anyone wanting such a large hard drive is missing the point of a netbook, and is likely to be disappointed. If you have the need for 160GB of storage, you'll probably find very quickly that the screen is not high enough, and the keyboard is too small...

Reply Parent Score: 6

midoriconcept Member since:
2006-12-01

Well the argument about HD size is not really convincing. 8 gigs is very very low. Os would take a couple of gigs, and I may want to load some music and a couple of movies when I take a plane... So 8 gigs is just too low, less than an iPod!

Reply Parent Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Actually, 160 gb is not all that much space when you think about it. Personally, I have all my music and audiobooks loaded onto my netbook just like I do on my desktop. That's about 50 gigs right there, way beyond what an 8 gig ssd could offer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I do not really get this
by MrWeeble on Tue 18th Aug 2009 11:44 in reply to "RE: I do not really get this"
MrWeeble Member since:
2007-04-18

I got a Dell Mini 9 with a 4GB SSD drive which I am regretting, the OS as it comes takes up well over 2GB. Add a couple of extra applications to it and you soon start filling it up. First time I tried updating I ran out of disk space while downloading the updates. 8GB probably would be fine, 4GB is just too small however.

For my files and stuff, I don't use the SSD, instead I make use of the SDHC slot and have an 8GB card in there with movies and music on, and for more stuff I have a 160GB USB mini harddrive that I take if I need to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: I do not really get this
by dragSidious on Mon 17th Aug 2009 21:15 in reply to "I do not really get this"
dragSidious Member since:
2009-04-17

The Windows licensing for Dell's Netbooks are minimal.

The difference between raw costs associated with Linux and Windows is actually pretty pointless.

With Windows there is a licensing, but with Linux Dell bundles codecs (WMV/WMA/MP3/etc) which has patent licensing. (Don't worry. Out of the MS license MS pays some patent fees for codecs also)

The reason you use Linux on a Netbook is that the UI for Linux is more easily taylored and the hardware costs to get Linux to perform on par with other netbooks is less.

The Windows system gets a mechanical drive becuase you need a mechanical drive for Windows. For Linux you don't need that so it gets a SSD, since that is superior for the task. (more robust, immune to drops and other things)

---------

Anyways in terms of Dell's upgrades it's going to be always more expensive.

If you want a big drive then it's much more cost effective to purchase the base model and upgrade the drive yourself. The same goes for memory.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: I do not really get this
by DrillSgt on Mon 17th Aug 2009 21:25 in reply to "RE: I do not really get this"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

The Windows system gets a mechanical drive becuase you need a mechanical drive for Windows. For Linux you don't need that so it gets a SSD, since that is superior for the task. (more robust, immune to drops and other things)


Why on earth do you need a mechanical drive for Windows? Windows runs on SSD's just fine.

Reply Parent Score: 1