Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Aug 2009 09:21 UTC
Windows Last week we talked about what Linux (well, okay, X) could learn from Windows Vista and Windows 7, focusing on the graphics stack. A short article over at TechWorld lists seven things Windows 7 should learn from the Linux world. Some of them are spot-on, a few are nonsensical, and of course, and I'm sure you have a few to add too.
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RE: How some things have changed
by uray on Wed 19th Aug 2009 15:13 UTC in reply to "How some things have changed"
uray
Member since:
2009-08-19

i see myself that searching application on google, download and install application is much easier than using package management on linux, i've been using linux for long time even i am a network administrator which linux is main O/S.

when using package manager, you don't know where the application data goes after installation, then you must really know the exact name of application, and it's waste of bandwidth, for example on windows when you download installer, you can save it, and give it to your friend for example, just copy and run it on another PC. on linux it was a pain in the ass for novice user, copy cache, copy rpm, run package manager installer, configure that, everything is a mess

linux really could learn from windows or even better from OS X in this case

Reply Parent Score: 0

molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10


when using package manager, you don't know where the application data goes after installation


and why should anyone really care where the application data goes? We're talking about ordinary home users here, not geeks who read osnews. Besides, all personal settings for the majority of desktop application (the whole kde stack, office, multimedia, etc) goes into /home/user/.kde, /home/user/.openoffice, etc. It isn't much different from how windows does it, at least XP stores settings in several places. C:\Program Files is just one, then you have C:\Documents and Settings with 1) All Users 2) Default user (hidden) 3) Username (that's 4 places).

then you must really know the exact name of application


that's complete nonsense. All modern desktop linux distributions (lets compare oranges with oranges, shall we?) offer search by name/category/description. In mandriva you even have everything neatly categorized (Multimedia, KDE, etc), but you can search for RPG and it will bring up all role playing games in the repository.

and it's waste of bandwidth, for example on windows when you download installer, you can save it, and give it to your friend for example, just copy and run it on another PC.


and how common is that, really? are we talking about "sharing" our application CDs, or your downloaded share/free/crapware executables? I have an application directory for people I install windows for, the total size of everything I can think of is less than 200 Mb. These include freely available (eg downloadable from the internet software) - things I consider useful for your average user (picassa, google earth, vlc or smplayer, openoffice, etc.) Oh, and I forgot to mention the risk of gettings some nice virus while you copy application X from your usb..

on linux it was a pain in the ass for novice user, copy cache, copy rpm, run package manager installer, configure that, everything is a mess


That was like 10 years ago... copy cache??? I don't even know what you're talking about. Repositories are auto-configured, and it's a one-time job (takes 1 minute) if you want more than available by default. "copy rpm" - again, no idea, you don't have to copy anything manually on any of the modern distributions (Mandriva/OpenSuse/Fedora/*buntu. It's all search-select-click install.

linux really could learn from windows or even better from OS X in this case


I just finished setting up an Eeepc for my mom (1000HE) - and installing all the software + updates took 6 hours, including about 20 reboots. I wanted everyting set up as a normal user, and it was such a pain in the ass in every regard. Lots of unnecessary icons on her desktop, I had to hunt down their location as Admin, same with the start menu (I wanted something simple for her). Even though as I said, I have a Software folder just for cases like this, for every application I needed (and wanted an up-to-date version) I had to go on the internet, google search for the downloads, wade through the individual websites for the latest versions, download them one by one, deal with several different installers, click half a dozen EULAs (either on the website or in the installer) - and you'd like to have the same on Linux?

Were it not such a pain in the ass (and if I had more time right now), I would have installed linux (but setting up Mandriva spring on a USB didn't work for me). With linux, you write a short list (openoffice, skype, smplayer, google earth, firefox, etc.), select them in the package manager UI, and install, latest & greatest in like 10 minutes...

Edited 2009-08-19 15:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

rockwell Member since:
2005-09-13

//With linux, you write a short list (openoffice, skype, smplayer, google earth, firefox, etc.), select them in the package manager UI, and install, latest & greatest in like 10 minutes... //

And then spend two years explaining how to open an Office 2007 document.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabjoe Member since:
2009-05-06

when using package manager, you don't know where the application data goes after installation, then you must really know the exact name of application, and it's waste of bandwidth, for example on windows when you download installer, you can save it, and give it to your friend for example, just copy and run it on another PC. on linux it was a pain in the ass for novice user, copy cache, copy rpm, run package manager installer, configure that, everything is a mess


You don't need to know what files have been installed, it's managed for you. If you do need to know, it's available in at least Synaptic, I'm sure else where too. Giving the rpm/deb package to your is the wrong thing because it won't keep in date. All they need is the name, then they can install it from the package manager themselves and it's kept up to date. If it's not in the repository, tell them to add the repository it is in. If bandwidth is a issue for a network of many Linux machines, you can use a repository mirror/cache, like Apt-Cacher.

I miss repositories when stuck on Windows. Especially when building open source code. Without package management your left manually resolving all the dependanies to the right versions of libs. Argh, it sucks. No, all OSs will have package management in the future. I mean what is the iStore if not a pretty package manager! Window will have to catch up some day.

Reply Parent Score: 3