Linked by Jordan Spencer Cunningham on Thu 20th Aug 2009 21:37 UTC, submitted by kernpanic
General Unix "The computer world is notorious for its obsession with what is new - largely thanks to the relentless engine of Moore's Law that endlessly presents programmers with more powerful machines. Given such permanent change, anything that survives for more than one generation of processors deserves a nod. Think then what the Unix operating system deserves because in August 2009, it celebrates its 40th anniversary. And it has been in use every year of those four decades and today is getting more attention than ever before."
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RE: Thanks!
by sbergman27 on Fri 21st Aug 2009 02:34 UTC in reply to "Thanks!"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Thanks, SCO!

The original SCO was not such a bad company. They had what was probably the best commercial x86 Unix for years, and after taking a few "first they laugh at you" pot shots at Linux, the CEO actually had the decency to publically apologize.

They saw that Linux inevitably had them licked, and sold out their OS division to the then-Linux company Caldera, back when Ransom Love was Caldera's CEO. Now granted, Ransom lost some popularity in the community when he dared to wonder if maybe (gasp!) BSD licensing might not sometimes more advantageous than GPL, but he was an absolute OSS saint compared to what came later.

He and his team got the shaft, and Darl, Chris, and the gang took over, renaming the company, misleadingly, to The SCO Group. And it is The SCO Group which we often, lazily, refer to as "SCO" today.

But the original SCO was a good company, with a good product for its time, which laughed a little at Linux, but then apologized when they realized that their commercial Unix goose was cooked, and shrewdly left that business behind to go work on their virtualization product (Tarantella) which they eventually sold to Sun. It would be more accurate, and more respectful to what used to be a good name, if we were more careful to say "The SCO Group" when referring to the stinking cess-pool of a company which goes by that misleading name today.

Reply Parent Score: 12

RE[2]: Thanks!
by fretinator on Fri 21st Aug 2009 04:38 in reply to "RE: Thanks!"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Thanks for clarifying that. I remember the old SCO - Openserver. I remember trying to install it on PC. Also, I remember Caldera Linux - not such a bad distro - not to mention OpenDOS. That was a very nice DOS. I'll remember to refer to the current thugs as the SCO group from now on. Thanks again.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Thanks!
by Mikaku on Fri 21st Aug 2009 07:12 in reply to "RE: Thanks!"
Mikaku Member since:
2007-05-03

The original SCO was not such a bad company. They had what was probably the best commercial x86 Unix for years, and after taking a few "first they laugh at you" pot shots at Linux, ...


I'm agree, I used SCO in the late of 80's (with Xenix) and in early 90's (with Unix and OpenServer) and it was really a very stable system. Then appeared Linux and it changed all completely.

I'm still have (scanned) the letters sent by SCO saying that Linux was the evil!. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Thanks!
by sbergman27 on Sat 22nd Aug 2009 02:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Thanks!"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I'm still have (scanned) the letters sent by SCO saying that Linux was the evil!. ;)

I don't recall them depicting Linux as evil. IIRC, they just didn't think that businesses would want to trust their mission-critical systems to a bunch of long-haired hippies with B.O. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2