Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 26th Aug 2009 22:23 UTC
GNU, GPL, Open Source When Windows Vista was launched, the Free Software Foundation started its BadVista campaign, which was aimed at informing users about what the FSF considered user-restrictive features in Vista. Luckily for the FSF, Vista didn't really need a bad-mouthing campaign to fail. Now that Windows 7 is receiving a lot of positive press, the FSF dusted off the BadVista drum, and gave it a fresh coat of paint.
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RE[2]: Meh.
by darknexus on Wed 26th Aug 2009 23:55 UTC in reply to "RE: Meh."
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

Going slightly OT, but the reason most people feel compelled to upgrade to the latest Ubuntu every 6 months is because that's the only way they can officially get the latest versions of software unless the Ubuntu team is kind enough to backport it which they do not always do. It's one of the problems with the way many package-managed operating systems work, especially those on a short release cycle like Ubuntu although Debian is even more severely affected given its extremely long release cycles. Systems like Arch and Gentoo, which are rolling releases, don't have this problem but with them you are on a constant upgrade path and that has drawbacks of its own. There's a middle ground somewhere, but one hasn't been found that would satisfy everyone. My middle ground would have the core os components (Kernel, Xorg, DE of choice and its assorted apps) remain on the cycle as they currently are but external software such as Firefox and Openoffice should be on a rolling release cycle within each os version. This would, naturally, take a considerable amount of resources to do, so it's not likely to happen. I think, however, if this middle ground is not found it will continue to be one more weight holding down desktop Linux. Windows and Mac users need not update their entire os just to use the latest Firefox, or Openoffice, or insert app of choice here, and neither should Linux users. This needs to be fixed.
Ok, done with my slightly OT thoughts now.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Meh.
by bhtooefr on Thu 27th Aug 2009 13:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Meh."
bhtooefr Member since:
2009-02-19

Ubuntu does have a third solution to that - the LTS versions.

Although, I don't think LTS gets application upgrades, just security updates, but you could use a variation on that theme to reduce resources used updating older OSes, by only updating a specific older OS. Pick an LTS version if you like your kernel and GUI to remain the same, but your apps to upgrade, or pick a normal version if you don't mind an OS upgrade cycle.

Reply Parent Score: 1