Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Aug 2009 13:07 UTC
Mac OS X We're certainly not done yet with Snow Leopard on OSNews! The operating system will be officially released tomorrow, but that hasn't stopped various news outlets from cranking out reviews of Apple's latest big cat. As usual, the reviews are fairly consistent: this latest release is the best yet. In addition, very welcome news for Tiger users: the Snow Leopard "upgrade" disk can upgrade Tiger installations too, and performs no checks to see if Leopard is installed.
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Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

Ars pointed out that upgrading from Tiger is against the EULA.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2009/08/29-snow-leopard-retail-di...

With all the new performance enhancements, maybe it's time for me to get a new Mac. My Quadra 650 is starting to show it's age.

Reply Score: 3

Luposian Member since:
2005-07-27

Ars pointed out that upgrading from Tiger is against the EULA.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2009/08/29-snow-leopard-retail-di...

With all the new performance enhancements, maybe it's time for me to get a new Mac. My Quadra 650 is starting to show it's age.


Just gave you +1. That was funny! I think a Quadra 650 is just a few years behind. But, if you insist on running Snow Leopard, you know... maybe "XPostFacto" might be able to help... :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Ars pointed out that upgrading from Tiger is against the EULA.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2009/08/29-snow-leopard-retail-di...

With all the new performance enhancements, maybe it's time for me to get a new Mac. My Quadra 650 is starting to show it's age.


If a man announces a EULA in public - can anyone be bothered listening? I've yet to hear of a person who reads the EULA and takes every line to heart. Maybe it is time for the EULA to be retired with something simple, "you bought this software, you can make a back up of it; what you do with it in the privacy of your own home is none of our business, if you want technical support, we'll only support you for the number of devices you're licenced for". The worlds shortest EULA.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

But...that would put the lawyers out of a job.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Leo Davidson Member since:
2009-06-11

If you're going to buy an upgrade version you're not entitled to and ignore the EULA, abusing the fact it doesn't its the requirements, then you're still going to be running an unlicensed copy in the end.

Sure, you've paid a bit of money to the company so it's "less bad," but it's still an illegal copy. Technically and legally it's no different to pirating the OS for $0 and taking advantage of the fact it has no activation/DRM.

Same goes for people who get "student" versions of software through friends when they don't qualify themselves. (I can see that it's more difficult to be detected, though. Someone who doesn't care about legality/piracy and just wants a copy that will continue to work forever for the least amount of money could abuse the system like that. e.g. Microsoft aren't going to know if the user connecting to WGA/OGA is really a student or not but they will know if you're using a pirate product key. It's still a pirate copy, either way, but they only detect one and not the other...)

Reply Parent Score: 1

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Maybe it is time for the EULA to be retired with something simple, "you bought this software, you can make a back up of it; what you do with it in the privacy of your own home is none of our business, if you want technical support, we'll only support you for the number of devices you're licenced for". The worlds shortest EULA.


Or better yet, replace the content of EULAs with nothing but a reference to the applicable copyright laws (IMHO, if an EULA attempts to prohibit actions that are expressly allowed by copyright law, that should automatically invalidate it).

Which would also do away with the overly-broad disclaimers that most EULAs include. Computer software is the only industry I know of where the maker can unequivocally disclaim liability for any problems that occur as a result of using their product.

Reply Parent Score: 2