Linked by Jordan Spencer Cunningham on Thu 27th Aug 2009 20:31 UTC
Games The recent release of the PS3 Slim brought about joy for those who were waiting for a less expensive/smaller gaming system and indignation for those who were waiting for a Linux experimental machine of the same type as there was no "OtherOS" or Linux option on this model. Why? we cry sadly. Because, the deep, omniscient voices of two Sony representatives boom back.
E-mail Print r 3   · Read More · 42 Comment(s)
Thread beginning with comment 381063
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
security compromise
by nt_jerkface on Thu 27th Aug 2009 21:05 UTC
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

Allowing a general OS like Linux on a console increases the likelyhood of hacking/piracy.

I thought it was a blunder to allow it in the first place.

Reply Score: -2

RE: security compromise
by DrillSgt on Thu 27th Aug 2009 21:11 in reply to "security compromise"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

Allowing a general OS like Linux on a console increases the likelyhood of hacking/piracy.

I thought it was a blunder to allow it in the first place.


I have to ask...

The hacking of and piracy of what?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: security compromise
by nt_jerkface on Thu 27th Aug 2009 21:24 in reply to "RE: security compromise"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

"Allowing a general OS like Linux on a console increases the likelyhood of hacking/piracy. I thought it was a blunder to allow it in the first place.
I have to ask... The hacking of and piracy of what? "

PS3 games/network. Any time you allow deep probing of a system you compromise the security of it. It's safer to provide an os that only provides the user with the functionality that the system was designed for.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: security compromise - how so
by jabbotts on Thu 27th Aug 2009 21:27 in reply to "security compromise"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

As the other commenter asked.. how so? How does allowing an alternative OS install increase the likelyhood of hacking or piracy. Further, how are the two remotely related?

Hacking is not inherently an illegal activity. Hackers tend to actually have a much higher respect for licenses and laws. How would one exploring and modifying there own purchased hardware with the understanding that it voids warrenties be a problem?

Piracy would be the infringement of copyright for the purpose of resail. The more common problem would be simply copyright infringement without the intent to resell or profit alternatively. I know RIAA likes to call any duplication of content piracy though. In any case, not allowing an alternate OS on the PS3 does not magically stop those with a second from trying to duplicate content. The alternte OS install does not inherently premote copyright infringement.

I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on how hacking and piracy somehow relate and how either becomes an increased risk to sony by allowing an OS installation.

I can accept Sony's explenation; they don't want to spend developer time supporting the drivers that easily allowed the alternative OS to function. I have an idea though; release the driver source to the public domain and let FOSS do it's thing. The alternative OS gets to keep working and Sony still reduces costs and "passes them on to the customer." It'll at least save the reverse engineering that will inevitably happen anyway so that OtherOS continues to function with or without Sony's blessings.

Reply Parent Score: 3

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

As the other commenter asked.. how so? How does allowing an alternative OS install increase the likelyhood of hacking or piracy.


By virtue of the fact that you are providing deeper access to the system.

Providing an OS with deeper access is more of a security risk than providing a menu with a handful of options.

By hacking I was mainly talking about cheating but it also includes compromising the system or gaining a deeper understanding to further piracy efforts.

Reply Parent Score: -1

strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20

I have an idea though; release the driver source to the public domain and let FOSS do it's thing. The alternative OS gets to keep working and Sony still reduces costs and "passes them on to the customer." It'll at least save the reverse engineering that will inevitably happen anyway so that OtherOS continues to function with or without Sony's blessings.


While I am not sure if I fully grasped your idea, I always remain skeptical about things like these. Exactly how many half-assed, half-working, and partially abandoned Linux ports we have?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: security compromise
by bert64 on Mon 31st Aug 2009 21:41 in reply to "security compromise"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

You would think, except that while the Wii and Xbox 360 both have cracks available to run pirated games, the ps3 does not.

Reply Parent Score: 1