Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Aug 2009 19:08 UTC
Linux A complaint you hear quite often is that the Linux desktop environments, which mostly refers to KDE and GNOME, are trying too hard to be like Windows and Mac OS X. Now, even James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at Novell, Director of the Linux Foundation, and Chair of its Technical Advisory Board (put that on your business card) states in an interview that he believes the Linux desktop is too much like Windows and Mac.
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Disagreement
by Delgarde on Thu 27th Aug 2009 21:21 UTC
Delgarde
Member since:
2008-08-19

The KDE project is trying all sorts of new things, while GNOME is more about gradual progress

Can't say I agree with that. Ignoring the KDE4 release as a one-off event, both Gnome and KDE have been very much about gradual progress. Both have been evolving over quite a long time, adding a few improvements with each new release, but without making many major changes (in core, at least - both have a variety of side projects playing with new ideas)

Reply Score: 6

RE: Disagreement
by No it isnt on Thu 27th Aug 2009 22:40 in reply to "Disagreement"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

KDE 1 --> 2 was a pretty big change as well. And, like KDE4, KDE2 took a while to stabilise. But as it remained in the same paradigm as the previous version, people were less pissed off about it than with KDE4.

Oh, and Gnome 1.4 --> 2.0 was a huge step, albeit backwards.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Disagreement
by Delgarde on Thu 27th Aug 2009 22:56 in reply to "RE: Disagreement"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

KDE 1 --> 2 was a pretty big change as well. And, like KDE4, KDE2 took a while to stabilise. But as it remained in the same paradigm as the previous version, people were less pissed off about it than with KDE4.


Code-wide, it was a big change. In terms of interface, not so much - as you say, the paradigm was mostly the same

Oh, and Gnome 1.4 --> 2.0 was a huge step, albeit backwards.


In what way? Granted, 2.0 had it's bugs (like any x.0 release), but was otherwise quite an improvement over it's predecessor. Indeed, I switched *from* KDE sometime about then (probably 2.2 timeframe), being fairly happy with what they'd done.

Reply Parent Score: 2