Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Aug 2009 19:08 UTC
Linux A complaint you hear quite often is that the Linux desktop environments, which mostly refers to KDE and GNOME, are trying too hard to be like Windows and Mac OS X. Now, even James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at Novell, Director of the Linux Foundation, and Chair of its Technical Advisory Board (put that on your business card) states in an interview that he believes the Linux desktop is too much like Windows and Mac.
Thread beginning with comment 381124
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
The TWM, Ion & Others...
by hoak on Thu 27th Aug 2009 23:10 UTC
hoak
Member since:
2007-12-17

It's obvious that no matter what; Linux will be 'damned' just because it's Linux; though I personally would like to see one of the TWMs like Ion incorporated or even become the default Window Manager in a popular Linux Distro.

The Tiling Window Manager is the defacto underlying design where ever form must follow function and a fast, easy-to-use, results oriented interface is required. From Aircraft and Ship MFDs, to mission critical and real-time systems management interfaces like those Nuclear Reactors, to the results oriented interfaces of productivity applications; the TWM design automates more of the interface, is more efficient for it, and easier to use -- period.

While TWMs may not have the superficial, glamorous, toy-like aspect of the cascading windows desktop allegory; they don't have to forego it, and can offer Linux the in-road to something that's more then just a leg up on Windows, that's both a lot more powerful, and easier to use...

=O)

Edited 2009-08-27 23:13 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: The TWM, Ion & Others...
by Delgarde on Thu 27th Aug 2009 23:58 in reply to "The TWM, Ion & Others..."
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

It's obvious that no matter what; Linux will be 'damned' just because it's Linux; though I personally would like to see one of the TWMs like Ion incorporated or even become the default Window Manager in a popular Linux Distro.


Problem is, most of the tiling WMs look awful - ultra-minimalist styling reminiscent of 20 years ago. Just look at the screenshots any of these projects provide - almost every one of them consists of half a dozen xterm windows, and maybe a simple clock somewhere.

And so while the features might be great, no major distro is ever going to put something like that in front of it's users by default - who could take them seriously? For the concept to go mainstream, it needs an implementation that *looks* mainstream.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: The TWM, Ion & Others...
by Doc Pain on Fri 28th Aug 2009 00:16 in reply to "RE: The TWM, Ion & Others..."
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Problem is, most of the tiling WMs look awful - ultra-minimalist styling reminiscent of 20 years ago.


To you. Well... to me, too, but there is a reason why such WMs exist. Reason: There are users who found that especially "minimalist" settings are the best environment for their individual work and productivity.

Furthermore, "minimalist" applies possibly to how something looks to you, but in regards of configuration options, some "minimalist" WMs are very extended! You can configure and change things that you don't have control over in, let's say, KDE or "Windows", because those do not come with any kind of interface that lets you manipulate such settings. And yes, I do consider a text based configuration file as such an interface.

Just look at the screenshots any of these projects provide - almost every one of them consists of half a dozen xterm windows, and maybe a simple clock somewhere.


Most professional system administrators and programmers that I've met do mostly use xterminals end editors.

But of course I do not judge from other one's screenshots. You can only form an opinion about a WM by using it. I've used many, and I didn't like many, and I could tell you why. "It doesn't look good" never was a primary reason.

And so while the features might be great, no major distro is ever going to put something like that in front of it's users by default - who could take them seriously? For the concept to go mainstream, it needs an implementation that *looks* mainstream.


If the goal is to appeal to the "average user", being mainstream is important, I agree. But that's marketing and advertisement, not functionality. If people do judge from first visual impressions more than from an educated point of view, well, you found the problem. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2