Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Sep 2009 23:10 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces You probably missed this earth-shattering news, but Ikea IKEA, the Swedish furniture and other assorted home decoration products company, has switched fonts. The company always used the Futura font for its catalogues, but the latest edition has ditched it in favour of Verdana. This has caused quite the stir among typography geeks.
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Fonts
by google_ninja on Fri 4th Sep 2009 00:15 UTC
google_ninja
Member since:
2006-02-05

Print: DTL Prokyon. Absolutely gorgeous font with a lot of style and character, also will set you back 1600$ for the full family.

Coding: Practically, I am a big fan of consolas, it is sort of the monospace font that looks like a normal sans font. Monaco is just classier though, and I have a soft spot in my heart for lucida sans.

On Screen: Verdana is an absolutely fabulous font, but IMO Calibri beats it.

Edited 2009-09-04 00:16 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Fonts
by sbergman27 on Fri 4th Sep 2009 00:33 in reply to "Fonts"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

On Screen: Verdana is an absolutely fabulous font, but IMO Calibri beats it.

We used to have green screens (sometimes orange) and were happy that the letters were readable. Didn't think about it very much, really. Then came "paper white".

Then came Windows 3.1... and my customers' employees started complaining about "not liking that font" and I had to change them for them. Now fonts are a business sector, and a topic all unto themselves.

I assert (in no particular order) that if we'd never left green screens, productivity would be higher, the world GDP would be greater, we wouldn't be in this recession, and I would likely be happier. :-)

Edited 2009-09-04 00:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Fonts
by google_ninja on Fri 4th Sep 2009 02:06 in reply to "RE: Fonts"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

Fonts have been a business sector long before computers became the primary tool for designers. In fact, many people consider the shift to computers to be the downfall of typography, because of how simple it is to bang out a font, most foundries nowadays are just sweatshops going for quantity rather then quality.

Win 3.1 shipped with arial (it is now the de-facto sans font) which was actually just a re branded sonoran sans, which was one of the second generation IBM fonts. Your story probably has more to do with familiarity with the font rendering engine on windows more then the actual type.

The weird thing about typography is that the people who are into it are REALLY into it, and the rest of the world just thinks we are a bunch of lunatics for caring so much about how letters are shaped.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Fonts
by CrLf on Fri 4th Sep 2009 11:26 in reply to "RE: Fonts"
CrLf Member since:
2006-01-03

I assert (in no particular order) that if we'd never left green screens, productivity would be higher, the world GDP would be greater, we wouldn't be in this recession, and I would likely be happier. :-)


You might be exaggerating, but I often think that text-based terminals provided for better applications in the (boring) business environment. This can be attributed to nostalgia, but since I didn't live in those days (I may have used DOS, and I may be a unix sysadmin now, but I never worked in the mainframe+terminal days), I guess this is hardly the case.

But lets see why:

1. Programmers (especially in the business environment) tend to suck at designing user interfaces (may they be fat or web clients) and waste too much time on it when they could be improving the logic;

2. A more limited UI (limited for the users and limited for the programmers) would force a focus on the automation instead of overloading the user (and this happens on graphical UIs both because of the programmers _and_ the users - which keep asking for more and more "knobs" until the final product eats more user brain cycles than the work it was supposed to simplify);

3. UIs would be more consistent and more easier to grasp for users (which seem to be less confused by text fields than innumerable graphical widgets and navigation styles). Additionally, business apps mostly have awful interfaces and are utterly confusing and inconsistent at best. See 1. and 2.

Of course, I'm talking about business apps here, where functionality is the important part. In the consumer space, this would be completely unfeasible (and stupid).

Reply Parent Score: 2