Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 18th Sep 2009 18:34 UTC
Mac OS X There are several things which take quite some getting used to when switching from any platform to the Mac. There are things like the universal menubar, the dock, Expose, and many more. One of the things that often leads to confusion for new users is the installation process for applications. Mozilla developer Alexander Limi talks about the problems Mozilla runs into when it comes to Firefox' installation process on the Mac, and a possible solution. Update: A possible solution?
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RE[6]: Comment by sonic2000gr
by unoengborg on Sat 19th Sep 2009 17:28 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by sonic2000gr"
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

What you're not pointing out is that it's a huge pain in the ass to distribute proprietary software in Linux compared to Windows or OSX. You shouldn't have to make your own repository to distribute a single application, but even if you do there are still distro differences to account for.



I don't have to point that out, because this article is not about Linux but about OSX. In OSX Apple have full control of what libraries they use. So applying the Linux repository model in an OSX setting would actually work much better than in Linux.

BTW, whats wrong with creating your own repository? It's an excelent way to provide your users with updates and bug fixes to your application.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by sonic2000gr
by apoclypse on Sat 19th Sep 2009 20:20 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by sonic2000gr"
apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

Did you not read what he said? Every developer would have to setup their on repo and for the most part these are too distro specific to be of any use to someone on an unsupported linux install. You have to have the proper version the distro that the repo supports, not every user knows how to add repos to their system and the whole one click repo add thing doesn't really work in practice. How do i know your repo won't conflict with the ones I already have? Can I trust your repo? How often are you going to update it? What happens to the repo once I update my distro install? These are all things that the repo model hasn;t really addressed unless you happen to be using the official repos for te distro in question.

I love the linux model, I like not having to hunt down dependencies all over the place, it also makes it easy to try new software without much penalty, however its far from perfect and can still be more complex than it has to be.

Reply Parent Score: 2

unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

Did you not read what he said? Every developer would have to setup their on repo and for the most part these are too distro specific to be of any use to someone on an unsupported linux install.


Again, I said, this would be a good idea for Apple. They have only one MacOS-X, so your multiple distro concerns would not apply here.

Reply Parent Score: 2

pjafrombbay Member since:
2005-07-31

... Every developer would have to setup their on repo and for the most part these are too distro specific to be of any use to someone on an unsupported linux install. You have to have the proper version the distro that the repo supports, not every user knows how to add repos to their system and the whole one click repo add thing doesn't really work in practice...


Have you had a look at PC-BSD. The PBI file format/process puts all the dependencies into each (and every) install package. This not only makes install and uninstall easier for the end user but it also makes life easier for the developer who can decide which versions of libraries etc. he wishes to use. What about the extra disk space I can hear you shouting! In these days of US150 terabyte hard drives, who cares.

Regards,
Peter

Reply Parent Score: 1