Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 21st Sep 2009 19:16 UTC
Internet & Networking Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the US Federal Communications Commission, today laid out plans to enforce net neutrality upon the internet. While the FCC is a US-only entity, fact of the matter is that "control" over the internet lies within the US, so whatever the FCC decides, it will affect the rest of the world.
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RE: Excellent news. - agreed
by jabbotts on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 12:43 UTC in reply to "Excellent news."
jabbotts
Member since:
2007-09-06

I pay my pound of flesh per month for a connection from my wall socket to the internet. I expect a rate of data transfer regardless of what those 1s and 0s happen to be. At the transport layer, it's all one binary streaming blob. Filtering parts of that binary stream based on the ISP'd arbitrary feelings is not acceptable. It's barely tolerable that my upload speed does not remotely match my download speed.

I don't want my ISP's "value add".. It's a simply deal, I give you money every month, you give me a dump-pipe feed. Don't bust my balls over what ports I have open or what order the 1s and 0s happen to arrive in.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Excellent news. - agreed
by pepa on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 13:38 in reply to "RE: Excellent news. - agreed"
pepa Member since:
2005-07-08

It's barely tolerable that my upload speed does not remotely match my download speed.

I agree with your general sentiment, but isn't this a technical characteristic of ADSL?

Reply Parent Score: 2

DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"It's barely tolerable that my upload speed does not remotely match my download speed.

I agree with your general sentiment, but isn't this a technical characteristic of ADSL?
"

While it does meet the characteristic of ADSL, it does not meet the characteristics of cable or fiber. Unless you pay much more, you will not get the ISP to make the up and down be the same. Cable is the dominant provider in the US due to the technical limitations of any DSL, mainly distance from the CO.

The providers do not want you uploading things, so they limit the bandwidth. If you have a business account, and pay much more, then you can get them the same. For residential, they just like to rake us over the coals ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

"It's barely tolerable that my upload speed does not remotely match my download speed.

I agree with your general sentiment, but isn't this a technical characteristic of ADSL?
"

ADSL, yes. Afterall, the A is for Asynchronous.

However, DSL is not inherently asynchronous. There are synchronous forms of DSL, mainly, you guessed it, SDSL.

There are other forms of DSL as well. It's just that ADSL is the cheapest to install and manage.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

It's not a technical limitation based on the last time I was working directly with DSL paired modems. We where doing a modem on each end of a security pair. Both ends could send full speed.

With cable, I also don't see a technological reason that send and receive can't run at the same maximum of the hardware potential.

With Dish.. you get a fast download through the dish but slower upload out through dsl lines so in that case, I can accept a difference in transfer rates.

The reason I've heard more often is file sharing. They like home users getting fast downloads but don't want users having fast uploads from there machines. Now, if you buy a business class subscription; fast down, fast up. I'm sure they also claim that home users having full upload transfer rates would overwhelm the network. It's politics and business strategy more than technology.

Reply Parent Score: 3