Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd Sep 2009 15:34 UTC, submitted by google_ninja
Linux During the roundtable discussion at LinuxCon this year, Linus Torvalds made some pretty harsh remarks about the current state of the Linux kernel, calling it "huge and bloated", and that there is no plan in sight to solve the problem. At the same time, he also explained that he is very happy with the current development process of the kernel, and that his job has become much easier.
Thread beginning with comment 385532
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Francis Kuntz
Member since:
2006-09-23

Theo does. My firewall is solid as rock ...

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Theo does. My firewall is solid as rock ...

Great. I've done that. I agree that OpenBSD makes a great firewall.

But try doing other things with it. Oh, I'm sure you can give examples where you can. You can use it as a web server. You can even use it as a desktop. But it is going to be missing desired features.

Look. For the things I need an OS to do in my personal and professional life, Linux is my OS of choice. But I am a posix fan before being a Linux fan. And I was a Unix fan years before there was such a thing as Linux.

But Linux and FreeBSD and OpenBSD are complementary. The posix world is stronger for having all of them rather than just one. (I'm not exactly sure where NetBSD fits in, but maybe it does, or maybe it's a fifth wheel. Not sure.)

I don't think that rock-throwing from the OpenBSD side is wise. Especially since Linux could subsume OpenBSD's duties more easily than OpenBSD could subsume Linux's. Even if not optimally.

Linus is not stating some new-found personal revelation. We've *all* known that complexity vs functionality was becoming a more major issue. And for some time.

See Linus' comment in one of the links regarding the relationship between "unacceptable" and "probably unavoidable".

Edited 2009-09-22 20:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

That's a matter of taste, REALLY. I use OpenBSD for almost everything - from embedded systems to the desktops, so please - don't judge only upon your own experience.

Regards,
marc

Reply Parent Score: 2

diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

Theo does. My firewall is solid as rock ...


Don't be so gullible, OpenBSD (Theo's work) is not much more than a forked version of NetBSD.

Theo didn't wrote a kernel, he forked an OS.

Edited 2009-09-22 20:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

marcp Member since:
2007-11-23

I don't want to upset you, but you're clearly wrong. I've compiled both NetBSD and OpenBSD kernels and I know what lays in the sources. They are definitely not the *same*, and the fact that OpenBSD is forked from NetBSD doesn't mean, that it's 1:1 copy of NetBSD.
As of my personal experience - I find OpenBSD much more clear and coherent, than NetBSD.

Again - that's just my personal opinion. I also advise you to not to judge upon your own experience.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

"Theo didn't wrote a kernel, he forked an OS"

Isn't a kernel an OS? I thought he forked a platform which included a kernel.

(sorry, I couldn't resist.. cheap shot I know but it amused me for five minutes)

Reply Parent Score: 2

toomany Member since:
2005-11-09

"Theo does. My firewall is solid as rock ...


Don't be so gullible, OpenBSD (Theo's work) is not much more than a forked version of NetBSD.

Theo didn't wrote a kernel, he forked an OS.
"

Mmmm... I think you're confused. OpenBSD (and all BSDs) are a complete OS/system. That is, a kernel and a userland part. Linux is a kernel. Just it.

Have a nice day ;-)
TooManySecrets

Reply Parent Score: 1

danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

Right, and there is not much else you can do with it at an acceptable speed. I guess it still does not have a unified buffer cache, does it? Or fine grained locking for SMP systems?

You could as well just download the UNIX V7 source code and tell us how slim it is. But the world has changed, and the 8 core 64 GB RAM world (what we will be running at home in a short time) is just more complex. And Linux (or NetBSD/FreeBSD) runs terribly much better on my quad core home machine than OpenBSD ever will.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Francis Kuntz Member since:
2006-09-23

And Linux (or NetBSD/FreeBSD) runs terribly much better on my quad core home machine than OpenBSD ever will.

And OpenBSD have terribly less security holes than Linux.

You can bash OpenBSD for SMP performance, but they can do the same with security. OpenBSD is a pioneer with a lot of security features that has been implemented in other OSes few years after.

Reply Parent Score: 2