Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Sep 2009 13:35 UTC, submitted by Hiev
Mono Project If you don't like personal, blog-style reporting, you might want to skip this item. A few days ago, during a speech at Software Freedom Day in Boston, Richard Stallman has, at least in my book, crossed a line that I thought he would never cross.
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RE: For what it's worth
by TheBadger on Thu 24th Sep 2009 18:06 UTC in reply to "For what it's worth"
TheBadger
Member since:
2005-11-14

For what it's worth, De Icaza has done a lot of good in the F/OSS world and working for/with Microsoft doesn't make him a traitor. A traitor would be someone who deliberately tries to undermine F/OSS projects and/or ideologies, but he isn't doing that. He is following his own interests and there is nothing wrong with that.


So when De Icaza and pals pander to Microsoft's technological monopoly on, for example, the Obama inauguration coverage, he isn't undermining "F/OSS projects and/or ideologies"? Such acts provide the figleaf for Microsoft's otherwise unclothed arguments about not having a monopoly from the moment your PC leaves the production line.

As for RMS... I really deeply dislike that man. He seems like a total nutcase with a 25-foot pole up in his behind, looks like an ass and act the same way. I sometimes just get the urge to drop using all F/OSS apps just so I could avoid having anything in common with him.


Right. So, in your mind the notion of Free Software is firmly associated with one figure and you'll gladly revoke those principles based on that figure's persona. Are you sure your computing choices are actually driven by such principles, or is this some kind of libertarian (or Life of Brian) one man per movement instinct in play? Sheesh!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: For what it's worth
by WereCatf on Thu 24th Sep 2009 18:20 in reply to "RE: For what it's worth"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

So when De Icaza and pals pander to Microsoft's technological monopoly on, for example, the Obama inauguration coverage, he isn't undermining "F/OSS projects and/or ideologies"? Such acts provide the figleaf for Microsoft's otherwise unclothed arguments about not having a monopoly from the moment your PC leaves the production line.

So when de Icaza and pals pander to people who want things done instead of hanging on to black and white ideals and that is undermining F/OSS? The world is not black and white and most people want things that work, regardless who came up with those things first.


Right. So, in your mind the notion of Free Software is firmly associated with one figure and you'll gladly revoke those principles based on that figure's persona. Are you sure your computing choices are actually driven by such principles, or is this some kind of libertarian (or Life of Brian) one man per movement instinct in play? Sheesh!

No. I just dislike him.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: For what it's worth
by nt_jerkface on Fri 25th Sep 2009 21:05 in reply to "RE: For what it's worth"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

So why does Silverlight even exist?

Why hasn't the FOSS community provided us with a decent alternative to flash? They've had plenty of time to provide one.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: For what it's worth
by TheBadger on Fri 25th Sep 2009 21:24 in reply to "RE[2]: For what it's worth"
TheBadger Member since:
2005-11-14

So why does Silverlight even exist?

Why hasn't the FOSS community provided us with a decent alternative to flash? They've had plenty of time to provide one.


Because it isn't one community and people presumably don't see the benefit. In fact, things like Silverlight do exist, at least in the open standards world: people may deride SVG and related technologies but they aren't really so far removed from Silverlight and Flash. Moreover, things like XForms are technologically superior to the mish-mash of technologies and approaches that Silverlight and Flash or SVG and JavaScript provide. However, the open standards world is restrained by having to forge consensus and is beholden to large vehicles (open source ones, by the way) such as Mozilla.

And this gets us to the part about deploying stuff. Mozilla and Firefox have been somewhat fortunate: a grass-roots movement has ushered that software into many places, but is it as likely that a random open source project would gain enough momentum to get that level of deployment? Meanwhile, Microsoft can pretty much push out anything and see it on millions of machines, thanks to their retail monopoly.

You make a good point, but technology is only one ingredient in the success of such solutions. How Adobe has managed to popularise Flash could be informative in popularising rival solutions, though.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: For what it's worth
by diegoviola on Fri 25th Sep 2009 22:04 in reply to "RE[2]: For what it's worth"
diegoviola Member since:
2006-08-15

So why does Silverlight even exist?

Why hasn't the FOSS community provided us with a decent alternative to flash? They've had plenty of time to provide one.


Go look at the web standards: SVG, Canvas, Audio/Video tag, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 3