Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:18 UTC
Apple If you have Apple's QuickTime media player and/or iTunes installed on your Windows machine, you might want to keep an eye on apple's Software Update tool. Apple is once again using the update tool to push unwanted software onto users' machines without asking for permission.
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Simple solution ...
by WorknMan on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:32 UTC
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

Just don't install Apple products on your machine - problem solved. If you need Quicktime, use QTLite instead. As for iTunes, I dunno... try Media Monkey?

These 'updaters' are getting to be out of hand. They reek of malware, but legitimate companies are using them. The one from Adobe is the WORST.

Perhaps this wouldn't be an issue if Microsoft would build a '3rd party software' option into their Windows updater, so people could get all of their updates in one place. Then, there wouldn't be an excuse for 9 million different programs to install their 'helper' apps in the system tray. Linux figured this one out over a decade ago. WTF is taking MS so long?

Reply Score: 16

RE: Simple solution ... - Mediamonkey
by jabbotts on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:42 in reply to "Simple solution ..."
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Great choice, when I was in the market for a Windows media manager, the Monkey blew everything away especially iTunes.

As for a third party software repository, it won't happen. I've said a few times also that it would be a huge benefit to the end user. Imagine, visit Windows Update and pull your extras from there along with your Microsoft product updates. There in lies the problem; MS isn't going to provide installs and updates for competing products. iTunes conflicts with Windows Media Player updates. Firefox conflicts with IE updates. Flash conflicts with Silverlight. The shareholders would never stand for such end user benfits.

True repository based platforms have so far had the benefit of not being the point of competition. Mandriva does not compete based on what browser the user chooses, they compete based on the overall distribution. Debian also competes through more applicable attributes (stability and security) versus limiting end user choice intentionally through the software available for install. The different business model is focused on benefiting the end user. Hence, the more Linux and BSD like platforms figured out the repository system long ago.

Edited 2009-09-28 16:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

jpobst Member since:
2006-09-26

There in lies the problem; MS isn't going to provide installs and updates for competing products.


I think the bigger problem is that MS isn't going to assume responsibility for all third party software. If one of those updates included a virus or spyware, it would be Microsoft's fault. If a new version of third party software broke on upgrade, it would be Microsoft's fault.

The user is going to equate that anything that comes through Microsoft/Windows Update is coming from Microsoft, so the blame is always going to go to Microsoft. I doubt they want that on their reputation.

Reply Parent Score: 3

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

There in lies the problem; MS isn't going to provide installs and updates for competing products. iTunes conflicts with Windows Media Player updates. Firefox conflicts with IE updates. Flash conflicts with Silverlight. The shareholders would never stand for such end user benfits.


Why not, they do it for hardware, and probably some hardware devices (such as keyboard and mice) that compete with their own. Also, since this will greatly decrease the amount of crap that runs at startup, people's machines are going to run better, which means happier users, which ultimately benefits MS in the long run. Because most uninformed users will install all kinds of apps that have updaters or 'helper' applets running at startup, and then blame Windows for being so slow.

Per the comments of another poster, they could scan for viruses/malware when updates are uploaded. I've downloaded a driver from Windows update that BSOD'd my machine, so I don't think the liability thing would be an issue (if it hasn't been so far with the hardware drivers).

The different business model is focused on benefiting the end user. Hence, the more Linux and BSD like platforms figured out the repository system long ago.


I don't really subscribe to the notion that Linux/BSD (and FOSS in general) is end-user oriented. If that were the case, we'd have one single repository that worked on all distros instead of every distro having their own. And don't tell me such a thing isn't possible. There's too many smart people in the FOSS world for them not to be able to figure that sh*t out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Simple solution ...
by WereCatf on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:59 in reply to "Simple solution ..."
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

As for iTunes, I dunno... try Media Monkey?

I personally like Songbird a lot. It looks quite similar as iTunes, but it's free, doesn't try to install all kinds of crap on your PC, and has so far been absolutely rock solid on my PC.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Simple solution ...
by linumax on Mon 28th Sep 2009 22:44 in reply to "RE: Simple solution ..."
linumax Member since:
2007-02-07

As a media manager, there are plenty of fairly good alternatives out there. Most outperform iTunes on Windows and some provide extra functionality that iTunes is missing.

However, trouble comes in when you want to sync your iPod/iPhone where alternatives at best support very basic sync, if at all.

With the ever-growing share of Apple in PMP and Smartphone market, more and more people fall into the iTunes (and consequently, QT, Safari, etc.) trap.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Simple solution ...
by jrbrewin on Tue 29th Sep 2009 16:06 in reply to "Simple solution ..."
jrbrewin Member since:
2009-05-06

If this was, say microsoft, instead of apple, and the platform was, say OSX, instead of windows, people would be going absolutely and totally ape over the practice of doing default additional software installs.

so what?

so, someone needs to hold apple responsbile for this, and actually take them to task about this practice. They've been doing it for a year or two now, pushing safari on to users that didn't want or ask for it. When asked apple simple shrugged off the complaint.

lets be clear, you don't even need quicktime or itunes. I have a mac book pro with bootcamp drivers installed in windows, no other apple software components. again, by default it's prompting to install pretty much all of apple's windows software every time i boot the laptop up..

A total and utter disgrace! perhaps they should relabel the software as "apple malware pusher" instead?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Simple solution ...
by kaiwai on Wed 30th Sep 2009 02:18 in reply to "Simple solution ..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Just don't install Apple products on your machine - problem solved. If you need Quicktime, use QTLite instead. As for iTunes, I dunno... try Media Monkey?

These 'updaters' are getting to be out of hand. They reek of malware, but legitimate companies are using them. The one from Adobe is the WORST.

Perhaps this wouldn't be an issue if Microsoft would build a '3rd party software' option into their Windows updater, so people could get all of their updates in one place. Then, there wouldn't be an excuse for 9 million different programs to install their 'helper' apps in the system tray. Linux figured this one out over a decade ago. WTF is taking MS so long?


Or what you could do is actually decide not to install it!

I want someone here to show me where Apple is forcing you to install this update - come on all you Apple haters, provide proof to me that Apple forcing you to install this update. Either put up or shut up.

Edited 2009-09-30 02:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2