Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:18 UTC
Apple If you have Apple's QuickTime media player and/or iTunes installed on your Windows machine, you might want to keep an eye on apple's Software Update tool. Apple is once again using the update tool to push unwanted software onto users' machines without asking for permission.
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Your statement is false
by mlankton on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:40 UTC
mlankton
Member since:
2009-06-11

Regardless what you think of the particular software, and you are definitely on the anti-Apple bandwagon lately, once again you have printed something rather misleading.

You state that Apple's software update tool on Windows is "push(ing) unwanted software onto user's machines without asking for permission".

Lies.

The user has to choose to install the software by clicking an install button following the software description.

I wish the people behind this website would stop defending Holwerda and listen to longtime OSNews readers, at least those of us who haven't already bailed. I am getting really sick of reading his partisan, unqualified contributions to this site.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Your statement is false
by anevilyak on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:45 in reply to "Your statement is false"
anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

Except it shouldn't be trying to offer the software in question in the first place.

Reply Parent Score: 9

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I go to update Quicktime and find the update utility presenting iTunes and a third app unrelated to quicktime presented - and selected. I wouldn't have a problem with the updater simply presenting the additional software but it's an Opt-Out approach where the user must deselect the unwanted software. That makes it unacceptable.

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE: Your statement is false
by darknexus on Mon 28th Sep 2009 16:58 in reply to "Your statement is false"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Didn't you here? The anti-Apple stuff comes straight from the top, from David Adams himself. See this article:
http://www.osnews.com/story/21918
So it's unlikely it will go away and, truth be told, as much as I like Apple's products sometimes their business decisions and policies deserve to be justly criticized. This, I think, is one of them: they're leaving this new utility in the updates section of their updater, and leaving it checked by default knowing full well that most users don't bother to look before clicking the install button. It does make me wonder why, though. I can't think of anything they'd gain by installing an enterprise utility onto home machines unless there's something hidden in it. Perhaps this one was an honest error... or then again perhaps not. Who can tell in this day?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Your statement is false
by David on Mon 28th Sep 2009 17:30 in reply to "RE: Your statement is false"
David Member since:
1997-10-01

Not actually true, FYI, though I can see why you might think so. That's why I'm writing this comment. I actually got a lot of push back from the OSNews editors when I decided to publish my little emotional rant, and I haven't ever instructed them to write anything about Apple, bad or good.

As for my "give Apple bad PR idea," nobody else ended up thinking it was likely to be an effective idea, and a movement followed by one person isn't going to be effective, so I dropped it.

Incidentally, I agree with the earlier commenter that Thom is a bit misleading in that the Apple software updater doesn't automatically install this software, it just prompts you to install it. On my Windows machine (my main machine is a Mac), I always uncheck and disable updates for Safari and any other Apple software that I don't need. So I agree with Thom that what Apple is doing is lame and annoying, but I'm not as up-in-arms about it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Your statement is false
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 28th Sep 2009 17:54 in reply to "Your statement is false"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

You state that Apple's software update tool on Windows is "push(ing) unwanted software onto user's machines without asking for permission".

Lies.

The user has to choose to install the software by clicking an install button following the software description.


Push != install. Push as in, promote. Coerce. Trick.

Apple has - again - used its software UPDATER to install new software, making it LOOK like an update. In what universe is that acceptable? What if Microsoft did this? The world'd be aflame!

Edited 2009-09-28 18:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Your statement is false
by Mellin on Mon 28th Sep 2009 18:32 in reply to "RE: Your statement is false"
Mellin Member since:
2005-07-06

and microsoft installs add ons to FF without asking at all

http://techgeist.net/2009/05/microsoft-installs-firefox-add-ons-san...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Your statement is false
by lemur2 on Mon 28th Sep 2009 23:36 in reply to "RE: Your statement is false"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Apple has - again - used its software UPDATER to install new software, making it LOOK like an update. In what universe is that acceptable? What if Microsoft did this? The world'd be aflame!


Well, Microsoft does include an un-installable web browser and media player on every Windows machine in the stores, and it abuses its monopoly position to prevent those same stores from offering their customers a choice of pre-installed OS for the machines sold.

How is that behaviour any different in principle?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Your statement is false
by memson on Tue 29th Sep 2009 11:29 in reply to "RE: Your statement is false"
memson Member since:
2006-01-01

But MS update *does* push software. It pushed DotNet, it pushed IE7 and I even saw it push IE8 on recently on a server. I didn't ask for "Genuine advantage" either, which is far worse than anything Apple has pushed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Your statement is false
by kenji on Mon 28th Sep 2009 17:58 in reply to "Your statement is false"
kenji Member since:
2009-04-08

This article was linked and paraphrased from Ars Technica. You can't really blame Thom for this one.

Read the original link.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Your statement is false
by ecruz on Wed 30th Sep 2009 05:19 in reply to "Your statement is false"
ecruz Member since:
2007-06-16

No, your statement is false!

The program itself comes already pre-ckecked, so if you don't look closely, you will install it without your proper permsission.

That to me is the backdoor way and Apple has been guilty of doing that in the past. Quit apologizing for a company that is doing something wrong.

Boy, these are just corporations. Entities to make money. Why do you feel so personal about them? You better go see a shrink and get your head examined!

Reply Parent Score: 1