Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 2nd Oct 2009 22:27 UTC, submitted by twitterfire
Hardware, Embedded Systems We already introduced Dell's new laptop wonder, the Z600, to you earlier this week. What makes this laptop special is that it contains a small ARM motherboard which runs a special version of openSUSE Linux, allowing for instant access to basic functionality like checking email, browsing the web, and playing multimedia files. What's news, at least for OSNews, is that research from Dell has shown that people spent 70% of their time in the Linux environment.
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RE: Suspending is like cheating
by DOSguy on Fri 2nd Oct 2009 22:52 UTC in reply to "Suspending is like cheating"
DOSguy
Member since:
2009-07-27

You might want to try Haiku ;)

Personally, for quick mail sending/reading and visiting websites I prefer to use a mobile phone.

Reply Parent Score: 4

jello Member since:
2006-08-08

Tried the HAIKU alpha on 2 different computers (2 and 5 years old computers) and none boots through the desktop.
The older computer stays dark while the younger one at least shows the HAIKU text and some small pictures.

This said HAIKU has still a long way to go until it's usable for every day usage...

Reply Parent Score: 1

Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

What model of laptops are you using?

Haiku works on my old Dells and Compaq computers, and I have taken a flash drive into the stores to test out the netbooks for sale. So far it boots on all of them to a working desktop. Problems with sound, no wireless but always a working desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Tried the HAIKU alpha on 2 different computers (2 and 5 years old computers) and none boots through the desktop.
The older computer stays dark while the younger one at least shows the HAIKU text and some small pictures.

This said HAIKU has still a long way to go until it's usable for every day usage...

I tried the Haiku Alpha on a 2001-era Gateway with a 1.7GHz P4 and 256 megs of RAM, and a 2007 Dell machine with an AMD dual-core ~2GHz processor and a gig of RAM. Ran great in both.

I have an ancient (as in, my very first PC, and freakin' old) Gateway, from around 1997-1998. Pentium II 266MHz, 64 megs of RAM (upgraded from 32 if I remember right), and originally came with Windows 95. It'd be interesting to try Haiku on that, but I thought I remembered reading that it requires 128MB of memory to run well. Just checked, and the official Haiku site does, in fact, say that. I honestly will probably end up gutting the parts and keeping anything good, recycling the metal, and throwing the rest in the trash; that machine literally can't run anything decent these days.

Reply Parent Score: 2