Linked by snydeq on Mon 12th Oct 2009 15:24 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces InfoWorld's John Rizzo chronicles the 20 most significant ideas and features Microsoft and Apple have stolen from each other in the lead up to Windows 7 and Mac OS X Snow Leopard. 'Some features were stolen so long ago that they've become part of the computing landscape, and it's difficult to remember who invented what.' Windows 7's Task Bar and Aero Peek come to mind as clear appropriations of Mac OS X's Dock and Expose. Apple's cloning of the Windows address bar in 2007's Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard as the path bar is another obvious 'inspiration.' But the borrowing goes deeper, Rizzo writes, providing a screenshot tour of Microsoft's biggest grabs from Mac OS X and Apple's most significant appropriations of Windows OS ideas and functionality.
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RE: Command Prompt
by jack_perry on Mon 12th Oct 2009 22:46 UTC in reply to "Command Prompt"
jack_perry
Member since:
2005-07-06

Uhm, guys, I'm not talking about who invented the command-line interface; I'm talking about who first provided a command-line interface application in a windowed program. Read the article, already.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Command Prompt
by JLF65 on Tue 13th Oct 2009 00:19 in reply to "RE: Command Prompt"
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

Uhm, guys, I'm not talking about who invented the command-line interface; I'm talking about who first provided a command-line interface application in a windowed program. Read the article, already.


And that would be the Amiga. ;)

As mentioned by others, the author seems to ignore all other OSes besides OSX and Windows. It's a very badly researched article, even if you stick to a STRICT reading of the articles points.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Command Prompt
by sorpigal on Tue 13th Oct 2009 10:45 in reply to "RE[2]: Command Prompt"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

And that would be the Amiga.


And what year would that be? I'm guessing X and even W had terminal programs almost as soon as they existed. So, 198[34] would be the years to beat.

Reply Parent Score: 2