Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Oct 2009 21:53 UTC
Windows I never thought it was possible, but as it turns out, Microsoft has managed to produce some pretty good commercials for its brand new operating system, Windows 7. They are quite product-oriented, and carry the slogan "I'm a PC and Windows 7 was my idea".
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RE[2]: What features?
by CPUGuy on Thu 22nd Oct 2009 22:40 UTC in reply to "RE: What features?"
CPUGuy
Member since:
2005-07-06

Hardly a stepping stone.
Vista was basically a completely new platform, 7 is an enhancement to Vista.
I'm not saying it is a service pack, but don't call Vista a stepping stone.

to be honest, all this "7 is great" stuff is pretty freaking iritating. Most of what is in 7 is in Vista. The reason why Vista was iritating was because things like drivers had to be re-written from scratch, so they sucked, things weren't in the same place so people were no longer comfortable with where they were, people had to get used to UAC (people say UAC is annoying, it is really no different than sudo or OS X's pirvleage elevation system, people just weren't used to it), etc...

Vista hate was all hype (negative hype), 7 love is all positive hype.
In the end, it's ALL hype, and sheep go along with it.

Reply Parent Score: 8

v RE[3]: What features?
by mickrussom on Thu 22nd Oct 2009 23:12 in reply to "RE[2]: What features?"
RE[4]: What features?
by poundsmack on Thu 22nd Oct 2009 23:23 in reply to "RE[3]: What features?"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

Being critical is one thing, and is by all means not only acceptable but necessary. But your not just being critical, you are insisting everyone is wrong but you. That’s not having an opinion and presenting it, that’s suppression of everyone else’s. I agree with some of your points (I too think that 2003 was the god of OS’s, 2003 R2 ultimate 32 bit has been my desktop OS for a long time), but opinions are just that. It’s not a distinct science where scientific method rules out another educated guess by trial, error, and proof; to say that windows 7 (example) is not worth the upgrade and is not worth paying for is not based on fact and therefore people who think it isn’t are no more correct than those who think it is. Case and point, no one is wrong OR right, it’s all just words…

Edited 2009-10-22 23:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: What features?
by sc3252 on Fri 23rd Oct 2009 02:20 in reply to "RE[2]: What features?"
sc3252 Member since:
2005-09-06

I agree that windows 7 really doesn't feel that much better. In fact I am annoyed that the "classic" mode looks so not classic. The only thing that made me go "cool" was the changing desktop background, but that wore off fast.

To me it feels comparable to 2 gnome releases. I just don't see why its getting such praise, except for the fact that dell/hp/microsoft is telling everyone its the best thing ever and everyone seems to believe it.

Note: I have only used it for around a day now, so my opinion might change. Also I don't have a negative opinion of it, just not "wowed".

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: What features?
by Stratoukos on Fri 23rd Oct 2009 08:43 in reply to "RE[2]: What features?"
Stratoukos Member since:
2009-02-11

people had to get used to UAC (people say UAC is annoying, it is really no different than sudo or OS X's pirvleage elevation system, people just weren't used to it)


No, it's not. In OS X (and linux afaik) you only need to sudo when installing something, when you mess with protected files and when you change system setings. I can't understand why people keep saying that a system needing administrative rights to do the simplest things is a good thing.

In my opinion UAC is not only annoying, but also ineffective. Given enough false positives, users will start ignoring it. And since false positives are the only thing I've ever seen from UAC that's what everybody is doing. If it would fire up only once a month (when needed), then a user wouldn't be so eager to press continue.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: What features?
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 23rd Oct 2009 09:34 in reply to "RE[3]: What features?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

No, it's not. In OS X (and linux afaik) you only need to sudo when installing something, when you mess with protected files and when you change system setings.


Which are exactly the ONLY use cases for UAC, too.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: What features?
by CPUGuy on Fri 23rd Oct 2009 19:14 in reply to "RE[3]: What features?"
CPUGuy Member since:
2005-07-06

I hate to break it to you, but that is all that Vista uses UAC for as well.

Part of the problem is things that get installed in to the "All Users" profile.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: What features?
by boldingd on Fri 23rd Oct 2009 21:52 in reply to "RE[3]: What features?"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

Most of the problems with UAC trace back to the fact that they're trying to use a privilege-escalation-based security system with an account that already has administrator rights.

In most Linux systems, you'll log in as an unprivileged user. When you need to do something sensitive, you'll use sudo to run a process as root that will perform the task you want done. Once you run a process ass root... it's root, no more questions asked.

In Vista, you're a privileged user by default. UAC guards certain functions that even the privileged user cannot perform without authorization. UAC will therefore annoy you every time you perform that action, even if you're doing it multiple times from within one process that you've already authorized once.

That's the big problem, IMHO. If Vista had used a Linuxy model, where you weren't privileged by default, you only ever had to escalate a process once, and once you where privileged, the security system wouldn't ask you any more questions, then that approach would've worked fine. The big problem is that you can take pains to run a process as root... and UAC will still whine at you, possibly repeatedly.

Reply Parent Score: 2