Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Oct 2009 21:53 UTC
Windows I never thought it was possible, but as it turns out, Microsoft has managed to produce some pretty good commercials for its brand new operating system, Windows 7. They are quite product-oriented, and carry the slogan "I'm a PC and Windows 7 was my idea".
Thread beginning with comment 390582
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
soonerproud
Member since:
2008-03-05

Don't try to upgrade your existing PC from a previous version of Windows, it will prove very expensive (especially of your time) even if it is actually even possible:

snip

Gartner estimates that real migration costs will be between $1,035 & $1,930 per user from Windows XP to Windows 7.

snip

Ouch.

For an update of dubious value, that is a significant outlay if one has a number of users.


First the poster above was most likely talking about his/her personal PC which cost nowhere near $2000 to migrate to Windows 7. The average cost of a upgrade to Windows 7 for home users will be the cost of a OEM copy of Home Premium since Win 7 uses less resources than Vista and does not require significant upgrades.

Next the second link is the Inquirer and they are hardly a reliable source of information on anything related to technology. The Inquirer is nothing more than a technology gossip rag.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Don't try to upgrade your existing PC from a previous version of Windows, it will prove very expensive (especially of your time) even if it is actually even possible:

snip

Gartner estimates that real migration costs will be between $1,035 & $1,930 per user from Windows XP to Windows 7.

snip

Ouch.

For an update of dubious value, that is a significant outlay if one has a number of users.


First the poster above was most likely talking about his/her personal PC which cost nowhere near $2000 to migrate to Windows 7. The average cost of a upgrade to Windows 7 for home users will be the cost of a OEM copy of Home Premium since Win 7 uses less resources than Vista and does not require significant upgrades.

Next the second link is the Inquirer and they are hardly a reliable source of information on anything related to technology. The Inquirer is nothing more than a technology gossip rag.
"

Why did you snip the links?

Is it because you didn't want people to find out that this estimate of the per-user cost to upgrade from XP to Windows 7 came from Gartner?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gartner
"Gartner clients include large corporations, government agencies, technology companies and the investment community. The company consists of Research, Executive Programs, Consulting and Events. Founded in 1979, Gartner has 4,000 employees, including 1,200 in R&D."


So this is anything but "technology gossip".

Gartner's estimate:
"Finally, and perhaps most importantly in these cash-strapped times, Gartner urged companies to budget carefully. The analyst firm said that migration costs could be $1,035 to $1,930 (£635 to £1,185) per user to move from Windows XP to Windows 7, and $339 to $510 (£208 to £313) per user to move from Windows Vista to Windows 7, depending on how the migration is approached."


My bold.

Note also the context: "Gartner urged companies to budget carefully". They are talking about the per-user costs for businesses to upgrade to Windows 7.

Edited 2009-10-23 07:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Why did you snip the links?


Ever hear of brevity? ...on second thought, after looking at the rest of your post, I see the answer is "no."

Reply Parent Score: 2

soonerproud Member since:
2008-03-05

It is called brevity as another poster has pointed out. The links were redundant and people can go to the original post to click on them if need be.

You also have a comprehension issue when I specifically posted that the cost to migrate for home users would typically be the price of a OEM copy of Win 7. It damned sure is not the $1000 to $2000 you keep citing and even those figures for businesses is questionable when you don't include the savings that Win 7 can provide in better power management and default security over 2000/XP.

I stand by my statement on The Inquirer as they like to cherry pick studies like these to always present Windows in a bad light. They are hardly legitimate news.

Edited 2009-10-23 23:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1