Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Oct 2009 21:53 UTC
Windows I never thought it was possible, but as it turns out, Microsoft has managed to produce some pretty good commercials for its brand new operating system, Windows 7. They are quite product-oriented, and carry the slogan "I'm a PC and Windows 7 was my idea".
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tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

Don't try to upgrade your existing PC from a previous version of Windows, it will prove very expensive (especially of your time) even if it is actually even possible


Since fewer than 1% of people (eg. geeks, enthusiasts) actually do upgrades from one OS to another -- and instead get their OS preinstalled when they buy a new machine -- this is a non-issue for the vast majority of people.

Gartner estimates that real migration costs will be between $1,035 & $1,930 per user from Windows XP to Windows 7.


First, that estimate is based on a projected cost for businesses, not consumers. Second, businesses can't run XP indefinitely. XP is reaching its end-of-life support timeline and, so, businesses are going to ultimately have to incur some kind of migration cost, regardless of which OS they migrate to. Like everybody else, most businesses get their OSes preinstalled on new machines, and then depreciate those assets over some fixed time period. It's not a question of IF but WHEN they will migrate. Third, future OSes aren't going to make migration costs magically disappear. Fourth, these costs don't factor in the use of virtual machine technology for keeping older applications running.

Edited 2009-10-23 18:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

telns Member since:
2009-06-18

Don't try to upgrade your existing PC from a previous version of Windows, it will prove very expensive (especially of your time) even if it is actually even possible


My upgrade from Vista to W7 was very smooth. Almost everything worked, and the few things I had to fix were minor. It saved a great amount of time vs. reinstalling from scratch.

Gartner estimates that real migration costs will be between $1,035 & $1,930 per user from Windows XP to Windows 7.


This seems improbably high for a home user, as the upgrade cost would be much higher than the cost of replacing their entire computer, printer, and peripherals. If they _did_ replace all their gear to get W7, the benefits are unlikely to be limited to the improvements in W7 itself. That is, because of progress in the industry they will be getting a much faster machine, more capable accessories, etc.

That isn't always necessary though. As an example of low upgrade costs, my own machine is a couple of years old and started life running XP (though admittedly at the very tail end of XP). My printers are about 5y and 7y old and both work fine. My mice are 3-6y old, monitors are 1-4y old, external sound card is 2y old, USB video camera is 3y old, and my joystick is about 5y old. All of that gear, as well as all the internal hardware, work just fine, so there was no additional hardware cost to the upgrade.

Reply Parent Score: 1

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

My upgrade from Vista to W7 was very smooth. Almost everything worked, and the few things I had to fix were minor. It saved a great amount of time vs. reinstalling from scratch.


Glad to hear that! I never upgrade, myself. I always pave a machine and start from a fresh OS install.

This seems improbably high for a home user, as the upgrade cost would be much higher than the cost of replacing their entire computer, printer, and peripherals. If they _did_ replace all their gear to get W7, the benefits are unlikely to be limited to the improvements in W7 itself. That is, because of progress in the industry they will be getting a much faster machine, more capable accessories, etc.


Gartner is including costs for retraining workers from XP to Windows 7, and possibly amortizing the cost of porting legacy applications on a per-seat basis. It's hard to argue about those numbers, though, because every organization is different. So, it's entirely possible that per-seat costs could be much less.

As for home users, there's no way that the costs approach what Gartner estimated, but they said explicitly that the costs apply to businesses.

Reply Parent Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Like everybody else, most businesses get their OSes preinstalled on new machines, and then depreciate those assets over some fixed time period. It's not a question of IF but WHEN they will migrate.

Oh... You are a lucky person to think that businesses buy new hardware when the old is "too old".
A lot of businesses buy new hardware if:
the old one is broken
the support costs are too high
Most businesses will go with: "If it works, it works".
The third category is only for IT related businesses, that are the only ones that actually renew their hardware on a regular basis. I work for such a company, our laptops are renewed every 4 years. They will even fix my old computer, if the spare parts have higher cost than a new laptop!

Reply Parent Score: 1