Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 27th Oct 2009 11:02 UTC
Qt The Haiku alpha is barely out the door, and we already have another important news item about the open source reimplementation of the BeOS. About 18 months ago, Evgeny Abdraimov started porting the Qt4 graphical toolkit to Haiku, and now, we ave some seriously epic screenshots showing a multitude of Qt4 applications running in Haiku, as well as a developer preview release.
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RE[4]: qt, not native
by moondevil on Tue 27th Oct 2009 15:22 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: qt, not native"
moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

I am all for native Haiku applications.

Actually I am more interested to try out Haiku than Linux nowadays.

I had some contact with BeOS back in the day, and still have the old R5 CDs somewhere.

My comment was more to emphasis that contrary to what many people think, multiplatform toolkits also bring problems.

For example, lets say you are targeting MacOS X, then maybe your usage of some CoreXXX APIs is what will set your application from the rest. Or if you are targeting Windows, maybe there are also some Win32 API calls that will make your application shine, when compared with the available applications.

This is of course an experience that cannot be made multiplatform.

Sometimes you can only target a specific platform.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: qt, not native
by leos on Tue 27th Oct 2009 18:01 in reply to "RE[4]: qt, not native"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

For example, lets say you are targeting MacOS X, then maybe your usage of some CoreXXX APIs is what will set your application from the rest. Or if you are targeting Windows, maybe there are also some Win32 API calls that will make your application shine, when compared with the available applications.

This is of course an experience that cannot be made multiplatform.

Sometimes you can only target a specific platform.


I just have to correct this, because for some reason this is a mistake I see so often from people when talking about cross-platform toolkits (most recently Google made this mistake).

Just because you use Qt doesn't mean you can't put in platform specific stuff. I have apps that run on Windows, Mac, and Linux using Qt. 98% of the code is cross platform using Qt. On Windows there is platform-specific code to do things like speech synthesis and some specific Windows behaviour that's not in Qt. On Mac I have mac-specific code to integrate into system services like spell checking.

Qt doesn't stop you from adding platform specific code to integrate into the environment. If a cross-platform toolkit doesn't provide 100% of people's needs, they seem to be inclined to throw the baby out with the bathwater and just start from scratch. We'll I'd much rather share 98% of my code between platforms than rewrite the UI on every single one.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[6]: qt, not native
by moondevil on Tue 27th Oct 2009 22:31 in reply to "RE[5]: qt, not native"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I partially agree with you, but only when it makes sense to re-implement the missing 2%.

Just for the sake of the example, lets say your application makes heavy use of OLE/COM in Windows. What would you do in another platforms, implement it from scratch? What for? No other application would understand it.

Or your application makes heavy use of the BeOS filesystem metadata. How are you going to provide similiar funcionality in another platforms?

Sometimes the 2% are just too much effort.

Reply Parent Score: 1