Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 28th Oct 2009 14:09 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Hardware, Embedded Systems When Psystar announced it Rebel EFI package, the company was quickly accused of simply taking open source code, repackaging it, and selling it for USD 50. While selling open source code is not a problem, not making the source code available if the license demands it is. Netkas, famous OSX86 hacker, and a Russian site are now claiming they have found the smoking gun.
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RE[2]: Wait, what?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 28th Oct 2009 17:00 UTC in reply to "RE: Wait, what?"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Because every once and then OSNews likes to take the path of speculative (rather than fact-based) journalism, probably because it wins them the most page views.


Like I said above (and if you would've cared to read the comments, instead of starting the baseless attacks right away, you would've seen it), this product is available to everyone, and as such, all you need to do to be entitled to the source code is to download the free copy they offer on their website.

And as the article CLEARLY mentions, we need to wait for someone to actually request said code first, and see what they do.

No need to buy anything.

Edited 2009-10-28 17:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Wait, what?
by koki on Wed 28th Oct 2009 17:16 in reply to "RE[2]: Wait, what?"
koki Member since:
2005-10-17

Not talking about the comments, but what you wrote in the article. These are your own words:

Now, I place a certain amount of trust in Netkas' words, but his evidence isn't necessarily conclusive. More investigations into the matter will have to be performed to get more conclusive evidence. The Russian site has more information, but sadly, even though I know the Cyrillic alphabet, I don't know any Russian other than Правда and Перестройка, and I know enough about translation to not place any form of trust in automated translations (hint to Russian OSNews readers).

Assuming Netkas is right, this is of course a very bad thing. EULAs can fall off a cliff for all I care, but an open source license which covers distribution is a completely different thing, as any open source advocate and anyone with common sense will tell you. Breaking them constitutes a breach of copyright, which is a serious offence.

I'm not about ready to crucify Psystar just yet - first, let's await their response to this matter, as they might theoretically provide the source code upon request. Second, we do need more evidence (or someone needs to properly translate the Russian page). In any case, it doesn't look good.


If that's not speculative, then pigs fly. Cheap shot Thom, really.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Wait, what?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 28th Oct 2009 17:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Wait, what?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Well, there is enough reason to speculate! If the one of the main OSX86 hackers claims his open source code can be found in the Rebel EFI package, and shows proof to boot, then that is something serious - he's not just some random forum poster.

However, as my article clearly states, I am NOT ready to crucify Psystar just yet - we need more evidence, and we need to wait for a response from Psystar.

There is nothing over-the-top or sensationalist here.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Wait, what?
by boldingd on Wed 28th Oct 2009 23:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Wait, what?"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

It's not; he's absolutely right. If Psystar doesn't provide source upon request, then we have a GPL violation. While actually getting a conviction in court against Psystar is another step you'd have to take, I'd say that, if they're distributing a binary built from (possibly modified) Open Source'ed code without providing source on request, then they are obviously and unambiguously violating the GPL.

And do note the last paragraph you copied:


I'm not about ready to crucify Psystar just yet - first, let's await their response to this matter, as they might theoretically provide the source code upon request. Second, we do need more evidence (or someone needs to properly translate the Russian page). In any case, it doesn't look good.

Given that Thom even said that, I don't understand how you can call this "speculative" with any degree of sincerity.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Wait, what?
by golimpio on Thu 29th Oct 2009 01:56 in reply to "RE[2]: Wait, what?"
golimpio Member since:
2009-10-17

If it's true they are using code from the community (and I think they are), the source code must available for download, we don't need to ask for it.
Also the license must be available for everyone to read it. I didn't find any license in their website.

Reply Parent Score: 1