Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 28th Oct 2009 14:09 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Hardware, Embedded Systems When Psystar announced it Rebel EFI package, the company was quickly accused of simply taking open source code, repackaging it, and selling it for USD 50. While selling open source code is not a problem, not making the source code available if the license demands it is. Netkas, famous OSX86 hacker, and a Russian site are now claiming they have found the smoking gun.
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RE[5]: Comment by kaiwai
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 28th Oct 2009 23:24 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by kaiwai"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

They also don't want to have to deal with 5 zillion hardware/driver configurations.


Ah, that old scare tactic: "Now Apple must support every piece of hardware and every combination of them!!1!1!!1"

It does not. Apple has no obligation to support installing Mac OS X on non-Apple labelled machines - it just shouldn't use legally dubious tactics (EULA) to prevent it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by kaiwai
by ari-free on Thu 29th Oct 2009 00:18 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by kaiwai"
ari-free Member since:
2007-01-22

I don't see what is legally dubious about a EULA. If you don't like the EULA then buy something else that doesn't have one.

Apple doesn't have to support non-macs but once these non-macs take over significant share, Apple will have to deal with the new reality. You know that Microsoft looks bad every time they release a new OS because of 3rd party drivers that don't work anymore. People will blame the OS company.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by kaiwai
by bitplane on Sat 31st Oct 2009 01:51 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by kaiwai"
bitplane Member since:
2009-10-31

I don't see what is legally dubious about a EULA. If you don't like the EULA then buy something else that doesn't have one.

What's legally dubious about an EULA is the fact that they're restrictions placed on a product after the sale. If you signed the EULA before handing any money over and the product came without the software installed then it might be a different story, but as it stands EULAs aren't enforceable in most of the world, specially not on operating systems which come pre-installed.

Reply Parent Score: 1